Bestselling Fiction: 5 Tips To Turn A Wonderful Mess Into A Novel

Bestselling Fiction: 5 Tips To Turn A Wonderful Mess Into A Novel

You’ve completed your novel. It’s so horrible that you’re ashamed. What on earth gave you the idea that you could write a novel, much less write bestselling fiction? Calm down. If you’ve got a mess, that’s AMAZING. It’s exactly what you’re supposed to have at the first draft stage.

Seriously. Never, ever worry about your first draft. You’ve got a NOVEL — even in potential, and that’s a huge achievement. Celebrate that.

(Please be aware that your novel may still be at the first draft stage, even if you’ve written several drafts… Many new authors fiddle with sentence structure and word choice, and imagine that they’re writing a draft. You’re not. You’re copyediting.)

All bestselling fiction goes through a chaotic stage

Let’s look at what a “draft” is. Creating a second draft/ rewriting isn’t recreating your novel from the beginning. (That said, it can be, if you feel that you’ve missed the mark completely and want a do-over.) If anything, rewriting is more akin to putting together a jigsaw puzzle, while creating some new pieces to fit.

Let’s look at some tips to help.

1. What are you writing? What’s the genre and story question?

Before you do anything else, reread what you’ve written.

Makes notes on the emotional highpoints — what makes you feel? Fiction is all about emotion, so you need to know what works, and what doesn’t, at this stage.

Then decide on your genre, if you haven’t done it already. Also, check to see whether you have a story question — this is the one essential which turns a mess into a potential bestselling novel.

2. Rewrite your major scenes: these are the BIG scenes in your novel

If you’re not sure about scenes, this article will help, Write Hot Scenes For Bestselling Fiction: 5 Magical Tips:

Scenes are the building blocks of your fiction

In the 21st century, every reader understands drama.

TV and movie stories are delivered in scenes. If you want lots of readers, you need to learn to deliver your stories in scenes too.

Readers are impatient. They just want the story. Deliver. Show, rather than tell. “Showing” means writing in scenes.

You’ll have two or three major scenes. Rewrite these, without focusing on what you’ve written. You know your story, your aim now is to deliver emotion in all your scenes, but most especially in the big scenes of your novel.

3. Check for holes in your plot: create new scenes

All plots have holes. You can ask someone else to find them for you, but try to do it yourself. Read through your novel again, and check the characters’ behavior and thoughts. Do they make sense, logically? If any character’s behavior doesn’t make sense, that’s fine — you’ll need to foreshadow the weird behavior.

While you’re checking, write new scenes where you need them.

4. Characters: introducing a character, and showing character changes

Next, focus on your characters. Check how you introduce your main characters. Your main characters will change in your novel, as they grow from their experiences. Make sure you’re showing the changes.

5. Check (or create) your timeline

Timelines can be tricky. You can have someone’s mother marrying at five years old, and a character in London when he’s supposed to be on a ship somewhere in the Pacific.

And your draft is done… now comes editing. 🙂

Want to write a bestseller? Check out: How To Write In Scenes… The Magical Secret To Writing Well And Selling More

Fiction: How To Write In Scenes
Fiction: How To Write In Scenes

Want to write wonderful stories readers love… fiction which SELLS? Our new program guides you in developing an amazing (and fun) fiction writing career: you’ll write better novels faster. You’ll also win fans who love your novels and are eager to buy them.

Read more.

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Short Fiction Secrets: How To Write And Sell Short Stories

Short Fiction Secrets: How To Write And Sell Short Stories

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Want to write short stories? If you answered yes, that's excellent… Here's why. Today, you can make money writing short fiction. More info →
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Write A Novel: Include A Bestseller’s Vital Ingredient

Write A Novel: Include A Bestseller’s Vital Ingredient

You want to write a novel. You hope that it will sell well; that it will become a bestseller. I just checked, and the first five books on The New York Times Hardcover Fiction bestsellers’ list this week are all genre fiction: thrillers and crime fiction. These books, as do all books on bestseller lists, include a vital ingredient.

That ingredient is: drama.

Write a novel with drama

To write a novel which sells well, remember DRAMA while you write. Drama keeps readers reading.

Many books which are dramatic are quiet books; they don’t feature billion dollar bank heists and explosions. Pride and Prejudice, for example, which has been selling for 200 years, is a charming novel set primarily in a village in rural England.

So how do you add drama to your novel?

How to write a dramatic novel: write in scenes

Start with these elements:

  • A character with a problem he’s determined to solve
  • A setting
  • A story question

The story question is sometimes referred to as the “dramatic question”, which is misleading. To write a bestselling novel, you need drama on every page.

Check your novel now, and if you’ve written 250 words in which nothing much happens, correct that immediately — add some drama, every if it’s just a little bantering between two characters.

4 tips for writing dramatically

As we’ve said, drama needs to happen on every page of your novel. There are many ways you can do that. These tips will get you thinking.

  1. No one gets along. Every character in your novel has conflicts with other characters, or has internal conflicts.
  2. Description is used to reveal character. Again, consider Pride and Prejudice. When Jane Austen describes anything, she does it so that we can learn more about a character. For example, from Chapter 7: “The village of Longbourn was only one mile from Meryton; a most convenient distance for the young ladies, who were usually tempted thither three or four times a week, to pay their duty to their aunt and to a milliner’s shop just over the way.”
  3. Focus on scenes. Jane Austen writes in scenes — this may be why she’s sold 20 million copies of Pride and Prejudice — it’s a very dramatic novel.
  4. You answer the story question, as well many many other questions which you raise along the way by creating open loops.

Want to write a bestseller? Check out: How To Write In Scenes… The Magical Secret To Writing Well And Selling More

Fiction: How To Write In Scenes
Fiction: How To Write In Scenes

Want to write wonderful stories readers love… fiction which SELLS? Our new program guides you in developing an amazing (and fun) fiction writing career: you’ll write better novels faster. You’ll also win fans who love your novels and are eager to buy them.

Read more.

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out our ebooks for writers.

Plot Hot-Selling Fiction The Easy Way

Plot Hot-Selling Fiction The Easy Way

$5.99
Author:
Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 3
Genre: Writing
How To Write Novels And Short Stories Readers Love: You're about to discover the easiest, fastest, and most fun plotting method ever. You can use it for all your fiction, whether you're writing short stories, novellas or novels. Take control of your fiction now, and publish more, more easily. More info →
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Secrets Of Bestselling Fiction (New Program)

Secrets Of Bestselling Fiction (New Program)

You’re an author of fiction; new or aspiring. One of your biggest challenges is keeping your readers entertained. Does your reader read your entire novel? If he doesn’t, your payments for Pages Read in Kindle Unlimited will suffer — as will any chance you have of that reader buying your next novel.

Let’s look at how you win fans: readers who eagerly read every word of your novels, and just as eagerly wait for your next novel. I’ll auto-buy anything new from John Sandford, John Grisham, and Nora Roberts. Someone once said that if you have 100 true fans, you have a business.

Readers become fans because they know that their favorite authors entertain them. It’s a huge relief to be able to buy a novel and be sure that you’re buying several hours of great entertainment. So, how do you write books which entertain?

To write a bestseller, you must entertain

Today, bestselling fiction is written in scenes. In the Victorian era, authors could get away with writing meandering 800-page narratives because few books were published. That said, classic novelists, who are read as eagerly today as they were 200 years ago, like Jane Austen, write in scenes.

When coaching my students, I’ve found that the easiest way to ensure than an author writes entertaining novels and short stories is to encourage him to write in scenes.

So, what’s a scene?

From Fiction: How To Write In Scenes:

What’s a scene? Become a scene expert

You may have heard someone say that your fiction is all telling, rather than showing. Scenes are “showing”. (Narrative is “telling”, and we’ll get to that in a moment.)

I’m fond of saying that a scene is “a unit of action.” Yes, I know… that’s probably as clear as mud. 🙂

A scene happens in real time. The reader inhabits your Point of View (POV) character; the reader is seeing what the POV character sees, touching what he touches, and feeling what he feels.

Writing in scenes makes writing your fiction easier

Writing a novel? Write 40 to 60 scenes, and you’re done. Knowing how many scenes you’ll write, makes outlining (if you’re an author who outlines) much easier. On the other hand, if you’d rather eat worms than outline, writing in scenes ensures that you know which “BIG” scenes you need to write — and that may well be all you need to know.

Check out our new program, “Fiction: How To Write In Scenes… The Magical Secret To Writing Well And Selling More”

Fiction: How To Write In Scenes
Fiction: How To Write In Scenes

Want to write wonderful stories readers love… fiction which SELLS? Our new program guides you in developing an amazing (and fun) fiction writing career: you’ll write better novels faster. You’ll also win fans who love your novels and are eager to buy them.

Read more

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out our ebooks for writers.

Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

$4.99
Author:
Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 4
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction
You want to write a novel. Perhaps you can't get started. Or maybe you got started, and then you stopped.You need a plan, broken down into easy steps. This program began as a 30-day challenge which I organized for readers in 2010. Hundreds of writers joined the challenge and completed it. They wrote novels. More info →