How To Write And Publish Kindle Fiction FASTER

How To Write And Publish Kindle Fiction FASTER

“Writing a novel takes too long…”

We’re all impatient these days. New writers feel that while writing Kindle fiction is exciting, it takes too long. One of my students completed NaNoWriMo last year, and is revising her novel, with the help of an editor. I suggested that while she’s revising, she start work on another novel.

“Maybe I’ll do another NaNoWriMo, but writing a novel takes too long…” she responded.

Yes, writing a novel takes time. You can write short stories, of course, and publish them. Alternatively, to publish faster, consider publishing serials. When you publish a serial, you write your novel, and publish as you go.

That’s what I suggested to my student, and she’s happily writing.

What’s a “serial”? It’s a publishing your novel in parts. Serial publication has a long history.

In 5 Serial Novel Tips for Impatient Writers, I gave you some ideas of how to do this, and compiled the tips into the infographic below this post.

Faster publication inspires and motivates you

Today, you can publish on your own schedule, rather than on a publisher’s, so you can write as fast as you like. Your biggest challenge is taking your own deadlines seriously. NaNoWriMo helps with that, but publishing serially is the biggest motivator of all. You know you need to complete an episode by a set date, because you’ve promised readers.

You’re accountable to others, and that makes all the difference. Rather than goofing off and watching another episode of Mad Men on Netflix, you sit down and write.

Can you publish serials if you’re a brand new author?

Yes, you can. In 5 Serial Novel Tips for Impatient Writers, I suggested:

Vital: realize that once you start publishing, the train has left the station. When you tell readers that the next episode of your serial will appear in a week, you need to make it happen.

My suggestion: write THREE episodes before you publish the first. Episodes two and three can be in draft form. The rest can be in outline form, but please, know your ending.

Publish #1, then hurry and get the next two lined up. And of course, keep writing the rest of the episodes, until you’re done.

Relax. Ideally, you’ll publish each episode on the due date. However, life happens. If your life gets in the way, that’s understandable. It happens to everyone.

Here’s how to deal with that.

Stay in touch with readers

Many readers don’t like serials, and that’s fine. Be sure to advertise that your novel is a SERIAL, in its description, so serial-haters can avoid reading, until you publish the complete novel.

In the back matter of your first episode — and all future episodes — include a link to your website, where your readers can join your mailing list. If you can’t meet a deadline for an episode, let readers know. (By the way — publishing serials is an excellent way to increase your readership.)

Write Fast; Publish Fast: Don’t Write A Novel, Write A Serial

Write Fast; Publish Fast: Don’t Write A Novel, Write A Serial

Sell Kindle Ebooks: Write Bestselling Genre Fiction & Nonfiction FAST

Sell Kindle Ebooks: Write Bestselling Genre Fiction & Nonfiction FAST

Sell Kindle Ebooks is a comprehensive self-publishing program which helps you to make the most of your talents. Take advantage of the power of Amazon to write both genre fiction, AND nonfiction. It’s time to develop a publishing program, and tell your day job goodbye.

You receive everything you need to become a publisher of both fiction and nonfiction.

Characters In Novels: Use Shorthand To Characterize Them

Characters In Novels: Use Shorthand To Characterize Them

We’ve all had the problem: how do you make fictional characters seem real? Characters in novels aren’t real people, but when they come alive in your story, they seem real. There’s an easy way to get that effect.

Consider the people you know. How do you think about them?

Let’s say someone mentions a person you haven’t thought of in years. You think:

  • That’s the older guy with the scruffy six-day beard; or
  • She’s confident — always quick to smile, wears nice clothes; or
  • He’s a grabby sleaze; or
  • He’s always talking about cars…

As soon as you think of someone, whether you know them well or not, you have a mental image of them: a visual and verbal shorthand.

I started writing a new novel a couple of days ago. This morning, I had a bunch of character names, ages and occupations. I had a mental image of each of them, and it was time to write down their primary traits.

Forget your characters’ bios, think about their traits

Some writers like to write character bios. I’ve never been able to do that. If it works for you, that’s great. It just doesn’t work for me. I need to see the characters in action. People are defined by what they do, so after I’ve established a character, I think about his primary traits.

Here’s a list of character traits to start you thinking about traits. Chances are good that even if you’ve only written a few thousand words of your novel, you know what your characters are like. Write down your impressions, now. Then as you write, you can show that she’s confident, or that he’s grabby, or whatever.

Before long, your characters will seem real to you, and they’ll be real to your readers too.

Story Power: short stories made easy

Story Power

Story Power — insider secrets of writing short stories and making them work for you: writing serials, and series.

Write with me: over four weeks, you’ll discover HOW to not only write short fiction, but also make money at it. I make a very nice income ghostwriting fiction for clients, and also selling my own short fiction under various genre pen names.

, on Twitter: @angee, and find Angela on Pinterest, too.

How to profit from your writing: online store.

Kindle Publishing: Fast And Easy Stat Checker

Kindle Publishing: Fast And Easy Stat Checker

If you’re checking your Kindle publishing stats several times a day, and are either depressed or elated at the results, there’s an easier way to check. You’ll get the bad or good news much faster.

Install Book Report into your favorite Web browser. Then navigate to your KDP dashboard, click the browser button, and voila! — instant stats. Moreover, you can tinker with the settings to get the info you want. You get 90 days worth of stats, and can check individual pen names if you like; you can even compare two pen names.

No one sees your stats except you. Your information is kept on your computer, no one else’s, so it’s secure.

I’m sure you’re wondering about pricing. It’s free for everyone for 14 days. Then $10 per month if you earned more than $1,000 from Amazon in the previous 30 days.

I’ve always disliked the KDP sales dashboard, so I love Book Report. Magic. :-)

Closeouts: check out the bargains to help you to write more, and sell more

Writing programs to increase your profits, from today -- closeouts mean you SAVE

To meet my goals for 2015, I’m closing out some of our bestselling programs, so that I can focus on coaching and publishing. This means that you get special offerings on some of our current programs. When they close, they’ll close for good. And yes, you receive coaching with them too. :-) Enjoy.

, on Twitter: @angee, and find Angela on Pinterest, too.

How to profit from your writing: online store.

Fast Fiction: How to Write a QUICK Short Story

Fast Fiction: How to Write a QUICK Short Story

You want to write a short story. I covered how to write your first one here, but I receive questions about it every week. There’s nothing much to it, I swear.

If you want more information, check out Story Power.

The above graphic may help too.

You:

  1. Start With a Character…
  2. … With a Motive, And…
  3. Intrigue.

And the tip: entertain yourself, and you’ll entertain readers. The tip’s vital. If you’re intrigued by your story, your readers will be too.

Start with an appealing character for your genre

If you know your genre, you’re golden. As I said here:

Readers have favorite genres. I love Westerns and will read just about anything with cowboys and horses. I also love Victorian fiction, so stories set in the past appeal to me.

If you have a favorite genre, think about the tropes in that genre. Or about your favorite novel. What stirs your imagination about it?

Currently there’s a huge writing industry that’s sprung up around Jane Austen’s novels. Austen’s novels are in the public domain, because they were published a couple of centuries ago.

So, choose a genre first. Then mix it up, if you like. Let’s say you’re writing a JAFF (Jane Austen Fan Fiction) story. Your heroine is Lizzie Bennett. She’s at Pemberley, and she thinks she spots Mr. Darcy in the shrubbery. It’s not Darcy. It’s a ghost of one of Darcy’s ancestors, who gives Lizzie a warning, and… I won’t go on, I’m starting to become intrigued. :-)

With this story, you’ve combined JAFF with a touch of the paranormal.

Aim to finish your short story in an afternoon

Fast fiction stories are short. You’re making a single point. Stick with a couple of scenes, and your story will be around 3,000 words. That’s a good length if you’re using the story for promotion, or you can combine several of them for a quick ebook.

Have fun. :-)

Story Power: short stories made easy

Story Power

Story Power — insider secrets of writing short stories and making them work for you: writing serials, and series.

Write with me: over four weeks, you’ll discover HOW to not only write short fiction, but also make money at it. I make a very nice income ghostwriting fiction for clients, and also selling my own short fiction under various genre pen names.

, on Twitter: @angee, and find Angela on Pinterest, too.

How to profit from your writing: online store.

Book Marketing Secrets For Budget-Conscious Authors

Book Marketing: Advertising Ideas For Budget-Conscious Authors

You’re writing your book. Writing, writing, writing… have you considered that NOW would be a good time to market? Few writers want to think about book marketing at all, ever, let alone when they’re in the middle of writing.

But now’s the perfect time.

Here’s why: when you focus on marketing now, it will help you with your writing. Because:

  • You’ll consider your readers;
  • (If you’re writing fiction) you’ll give thought to entertaining readers (start by entertaining yourself);
  • (If you’re writing nonfiction) you’ll think about how readers can get real value from your book;
  • You’ll be motivated to finish your book.

All good reasons to market. Here’s a bonus reason: you need to book in advance for some of the best promotional venues.

Start marketing your book now

What’s your budget for book marketing? Yes, you’re all about free, and so am I. To give your book its best chance however, you’ll need to open your wallet a little. You don’t need to go wild, and run up a huge bill on AdWords, or even a mini-bill on Facebook.

However, you do need to spend some money.

Matt Manochio’s article will give you some ideas:

BookSends ($15). Reach: 100,000 overall subscribers, 17,000 in the Horror category, although the web operator said those numbers are a little outdated and should be 15% to 20% higher. Results: 125 clicks, 47 sales. Put BookSends on your advertising list right now. I mean it. It cost me $15 and I more than made that back in sales.

Find your own venues — reader blogs, book blogs, and websites

Matt lists some wonderful venues in his article, but scout out your own too. Where do your readers — or prospective readers — hang out online? Ask them on social media. Then book an ad on any venue you choose, in advance, following Matt’s method.

Blog tours are popular with some writers, but they take lots of time. You can save time by advertising on websites. This means that rather than spending a month writing blog posts, you can spend that time writing another book.

Lowering the price while you’re advertising, as Matt does, is a good idea, because it will increase sales. The increased sales will help you to get onto more of Amazon’s lists.

Vital: set up a website with a mailing list

You’re spending money on advertising, and the best way to get a long-lasting return on that advertising is to ensure that you have a way of contacting readers again. When I coach authors, the first thing I do is encourage them to set up a mailing list, if they haven’t already done so. I’ve been using aweber for lists for a decade, but there are many mailing list providers.

Ask others where they’re advertising

Authors will often share the results of their advertising adventures on Writers’ Cafe, and on private forums. Make a list of advertising options to check out, and as we’ve said, book your advertising now, while you’re still writing.

When you know you’re running advertising in three or four months, you won’t dither on completing your book. Similarly, if you have a favorite editor, contact her about your book now, and reserve her time.

Book marketing can be exciting, and fun — so get ready now.

Writing programs to increase your profits, from today — closeouts mean you SAVE

Writing programs to increase your profits, from today -- closeouts mean you SAVE

To meet my goals for 2015, I’m closing out some of our bestselling programs, so that I can focus on coaching and publishing.

This means that you get special offerings on some of our current programs. When they close, they’ll close for good. And yes, you receive coaching with them too. :-)

, on Twitter: @angee, and find Angela on Pinterest, too.

How to profit from your writing: online store.