All posts by Angela Booth

About Angela Booth

Angela Booth is a top copywriter, multi-published author, and writing teacher. She offers many guides, courses and classes to help writers to enhance their skills on her websites. She also provides inspiration and motivation for writers on her writing blogs. Angela has been writing successfully since the late 1970s, and was online in the 1980s, long before the birth of the Web. Her business books have been widely published.

Write And Sell: 5 Social Media Tips For Book Marketing

Write And Sell: 5 Social Media Tips For Book Marketing

Oh the horror… Many authors hate book marketing, and they aren’t that keen on social media either. Authors want to write, and leave everything else to others.

Would that we could. That would be the best of all worlds. Sadly, even if you have the money to pay a good publicist, you’re better off doing most of your marketing yourself. No one knows your novels (and nonfiction books) as well as you do.

You’ll learn a great deal from marketing too. This helps your writing.

So — is social media useful, or useless, for book marketing?

Social media marketing: slow growth, then a healthy, ongoing harvest

Important: be aware that NO form of marketing is an ATM machine.

I posted about visibility on the freelance writing blog:

… (some) writers think of marketing in terms of “launches”. That is, they believe that marketing is something that you do for a few weeks a year whenever you have something new to promote.

… It works for a lucky few. For the vast majority of writers however, launches produce a tiny number of sales or none at all.

Look at marketing in general, and social media in particular, as a cumulative process. Just because no one’s bought your book in a week, after you posted on Twitter FIVE times, it doesn’t mean that no one’s seeing your tweets. (Try posting something stupid, and the instant response will provide a quick reality check. :-))

A reader may need to see mention of your book several times before he clicks through to your book’s product page on Amazon or elsewhere.

Now let’s look at the tips.

1. Invest in assets: create or buy great images

Images sell — seriously.

I know we’re all about the words, but people can’t read your words if they’re not paying attention. You grab their attention via images.

2. Create a plan to build your audience, reader by reader

Social media is social. You attract readers individually.

When you’re just starting out (and afterward too) think in terms of small wins. One response to a tweet; a like on your Facebook page… two followers on Pinterest.

3. Leverage others’ audiences with great content

Guest posting on other authors’ blogs used to be super-effective. Now, not so much. However, it’s still valuable. Leverage others’ audiences to grow your own.

4. Write and promote: promote your books before publishing day

You publish your book, and then promote it, yes?

No — if you do that, you’re missing out on a huge opportunity to build anticipation and readers before you publish.

I gave you a mini marketing campaign for social media on this post. Use that as a template to create your own publishing plan; start when you start writing your book.

5. The 80/ 20 rule: remember to promote your books on social media

Marketing on social media is a balance. If every post you make is promotional, you’ll never sell. On the other hand, if you’re too shy to sell, you’ll sell a lot fewer books than you could.

The 80/ 20 rule is popular in social media marketing. That is, for every four items you post, one is promotional. The other items provide information or entertainment.

You don’t have to adhere slavishly to the rule, but do remember that you’re marketing on social media to sell books.

Onward — book marketing on social media works if you do. 🙂

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

eBook: $5.99
You can, when you discover the secrets of writing blurbs (book descriptions) which sell. More info →
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Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99
I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly. More info →
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Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.

Editing Your Novel: Using Motivation Reaction Units

Editing Your Novel: Using Motivation Reaction Units

Your novel is DONE! Kudos… Now it’s time for editing.

Start by thinking about your readers. Writing is all about the reader. Sometimes we forget that. In the back of your mind, you always need to remember the reader, and his reactions as he reads.

In nonfiction, you write to inform, or to entertain, or persuade your reader. When you’re writing fiction, you write to give the reader an emotional experience.

Think about the emotional experience you want to give readers before you start writing, when you choose the genre of your novel. Are you writing a mystery? A romance? A science fiction epic?

Think about how you choose what you’ll read too. If you’re reading a mystery, why did you pick up that book? What attracted you to it? What emotional experience are you hoping for?

Once you start writing however, you’ll forget the reader, and that’s how it should be. In your first draft, you simply write. You’re discovering your story, and its characters.

Let’s imagine that you’ve completed your first draft. You ensured that every scene you wrote had a viewpoint character, who had a goal. Each scene contained conflict, and ended in a disaster for your viewpoint character.

Now it’s time to revise and edit your novel.

Nitty gritty revision: Motivation Reaction Units

Sadly, it’s VERY hard to get what’s in your head onto the page.

One of the best ways to ensure that you do that, is to make sure that every scene, and its sequel, contains a sequence of MRUs.

Randy Ingermanson has a wonderful explanation of MRUs. “MRU” means “Motivation-Reaction Unit.” They’re a way of decoding what’s in your head, so that your reader has the experience you want him to have. Once you understand MRUs, and apply them, your writing will instantly improve.

As this article, Dwight Swain’s Motivation-Reaction Units | The First Gates, says:

“Motivation-Reaction Unit is the fundamental building block of an action sequence (it’s important to stress that it does not apply to description, exposition, or reverie). It’s pretty simple: something happens, the hero reacts to it, the situation changes, and something else happens. “

MRUs are the way your reader experiences your fiction. Your reader is in your viewpoint character’s body, seeing what he sees, and reacting as he does. They’re powerful. You need to learn how to use them, and then write in MRUs as you edit your fiction.

Watch how writers use MRUs in your reading, too. Getting your head around MRUs is a challenge. Focus on scenes first. Does the viewpoint character have a goal? What’s the conflict? How could you make the conflict more intense? What’s logical? What’s unexpected? What’s the disaster?

In revision, you’ll find that in some scenes, nothing much happens. Be brave. Delete those scenes. You’re providing your reader with an emotional experience, remember. If there’s no emotion, the scene must go. Save deleted scenes to an “Extras” file, if it makes you feel better.

Discovering MRUs, and using them, will immediately improve your novel. Sometime today, take an early scene in your novel, and rewrite it, using MRUs.

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

eBook: $5.99
Your readers want to enter your novel's world. They want to experience your book -- they want to live your book with your main characters. More info →
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Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99
I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly. More info →
Buy from Apple iBooks
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Inktera
Buy from Amazon Kindle

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.

Updated: January 22, 2018

Writing Fiction: 5 Tips To Eliminate Writer’s Block Forever

Writing Fiction: 5 Tips To Eliminate Writer’s Block Forever

Blocked? That’s OK; it’s common. When you’re writing fiction, you depend on your creativity and imagination. The bad news: you can’t harness them. The good news? You can baby them and reward them into giving you what you want.

Writing fiction takes imagination, playfulness, and energy

What sparks your imagination? Pay attention next time your imagination flows. I’ve found boredom and repetitive tasks useful. Whenever I’m stuck on a novel, I go for a drive, or I dust a couple of rooms in the house, and allow my mind to drift.

Tip: avoid social media. Today, when we’re bored we pick up our phone and scroll through our Facebook or Pinterest feed.

Pinterest can be great for coming up with character quirks, but in general, to spark your imagination, do something physical, and boring.

Now let’s look at some tips which will help to eliminate writer’s block.

1. Enjoy rest and recreation: fill your well

Self-publishing authors find themselves on a treadmill. Amazon rewards new content, so for a month after you publish a book, your Amazon catalogue will enjoy a boost.

Some authors set themselves huge challenges, such as:

  • Publish a book a month, or even every two weeks;
  • Write a million words in 12 months…

While challenges can be beneficial, and anything which inspires you to write is good thing, you need time off.

Rest when you complete a novel. Give yourself time away for a mini-break if you can. Time away from your desk helps you to “fill the well” as Julia Cameron puts it.

If you allow your imagination and creativity time to recover, there’s less chance you’ll burn out.

2. Read for creative energy: find authors who inspire writing

Some authors, like P.G. Wodehouse, inspire me to write fiction. Reading nonfiction history does too.

Luckily I haven’t suffered true writer’s block (the horror) for at least a decade, maybe longer. But I do have days when I’m “not in the mood” to write fiction. On those days, I read a few pages of P.G. Wodehouse.

Here’s why reading works to unblock you: writers who get blocked have lost their joy in writing fiction. When you read a writer you love, you reignite your inspiration.

3. Your characters are your friends: enjoy them

Make friends with your characters. Think about them as you go through your day. Carry index cards so you can jot down ideas if you wish. I carry index cards everywhere, but it’s not necessary. When you’re inspired with a great idea, you’ll remember it.

Why this works: when you’re actively imagining your characters, you’ll be eager to write.

4. Grab your index cards and be outrageous

Recently a student told me that she was beyond bored with her current novel — and her boredom was shading into active dislike.

Here’s what I suggested: “list your major characters, and their attributes. Then make each one face his biggest fear, or his worst enemy. Be funny. Be outrageous.”

Index cards, the larger 5 x 8 size, are perfect to make notes on your outrageous scenes. Brainstorm ten scenes. Choose one, and write it.

Authors who block insist on perfectionism; they choke off their creativity. When you surprise yourself, you’ll regain your enthusiasm for your novel.

5. When you can’t write it, speak it

Do you talk to yourself?

Everyone does, constantly.

Mind-chatter aside, it’s fun to talk to yourself about your novel.

Tip: avoid talking to others about a novel in progress. Usually it won’t help. And if someone says the wrong thing — “that’s STUPID,” for example— you’ll lose heart, and the novel will be dead to you, forever.

Grab a voice recorder, or use an app on your phone. Talk to yourself about your novel.

You can…

  • Talk out the novel’s problems: “I don’t want to write this scene because…”
  • Discover your characters: “Malcolm is an unremarkable man — maybe he should be the murderer? No one would suspect him…”
  • Build your plot: “I need two scenes before the midpoint. What if…”

You can transcribe this material if you wish. The Dragon voice recognition software will do it for you if you have it. Usually however, a complete transcription is a waste of time. Listen to the recording, then jot a few notes of anything you can use.

When nothing works, relax, and enjoy writer’s block

Perhaps the cause of your writer’s block is rooted in something that’s happening in other areas of your life. If it is, wait for your life to become stable again. Just try to relax, and focus on having as much fun as you can.

Alternatively, you may be too disappointed to write. Maybe your latest novel bombed.

Here’s what to do. Tell everyone you’re giving up writing fiction forever. Have a tantrum. Throw things. Before you know it, a little voice at the back of your mind will whisper: “what if…” 🙂

Write Fast, Write Well: How To Be Prolific, and Sell – Powerful tips to increase your writing income

Write Fast, Write Well: How To Be Prolific, and Sell – Powerful tips to increase your writing income

$4.99
What If You Were Twice As Successful, Or Even THREE Times More Successful Than You Are Today? There's No Ceiling On A Writer's Income... You Just Need To Be Prolific. More info →
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How To Write, Even If You Think You Can’t: 21 Easy Exercises To Bring Out The Writer In You

How To Write, Even If You Think You Can’t: 21 Easy Exercises To Bring Out The Writer In You

$4.99
Do you find writing a struggle? I work with writing students every day who believe that they “can’t write.” And yet, they must write, for one reason or another. More info →
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Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.