Publishers Want To Experiment With Their Ebooks: You Should Too

Darker Night

I’ve been encouraging you to experiment with your ebook-publication program.

Publishers are experimenting too, as BEA 2013 – Less books, more readers? reports:

“I also heard from editors that they are going to want to see authors submit different stories because they want to explore niches and experiment with different content. I asked how they were going to get the word out about that and proposed that more publishers take direct submissions.  I was told the problem with non agented submissions is the need for more editorial staff to sift through these.”

Currently the ebook market is wide open. Amazon is experimenting with fan fiction, with Kindle Worlds.

How will you experiment?

Here are some ideas.

* Write some fan fiction. It makes me cringe, but if it floats your boat, you’ve got Amazon’s encouragement to try your hand at it.

* Try a different genre. I’ve heard from editors that Western romances and Westerns in general are trending upwards. They’re looking for more Western books and authors. (Yippee! I love cowboys. :-) )

* Experiment with different price points. The 99 cent price book is as good as dead. I’ve heard authors say that $2.99 is the new price point for first novels and short nonfiction works — see what works for you.

* Try a new cover design. One of my writing students was selling just a few copies a month. She updated the cover and is now selling 50 copies a day. A cover can make all the difference.

* Create a “set” if you’re selling several books in a genre, or several books on the same topic.

* Choose a different category for a book. A friend switched categories for several of her novels, and she’s now selling more books. A category may make sense to you, but your readers may be looking elsewhere.

* Write a longer description. Your cover, and your description SELLS your book. You’ve got around 800 words to play with, so use them. And please — this is a pet peeve — put your book’s description FIRST rather than the nifty blurbs you’ve won. I know people tell you to put your glowing recommendations at the top of the description.

DON’T.

Shove the “well written and exciting” and “couldn’t put the book down” snippets to the end of your description. Here’s why:

1. Readers honestly don’t care. If your testimonials are so wonderful, put them at the end of your description, or put them onto your author page and blog. They want to know WHY they should buy your ebook.

2. Amazon’s search engine. The script takes the first few sentences of your description as being the most important part of your description. If you have a lot of self-serving stuff up there, you’re missing out on readers because your book won’t be returned in the search results.

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photo credit: Rakka via photopin cc

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Angela Booth is a top copywriter, multi-published author, and writing teacher. She offers many guides, courses and classes to help writers to enhance their skills on her Writing Genii website. She also provides inspiration and motivation for writers on her writing blogs. Angela has been writing successfully since the late 1970s, and was online in the 1980s, long before the birth of the Web. Her business books have been widely published.

The following two tabs change content below.

Angela Booth is a top copywriter, multi-published author, and writing teacher. She offers many guides, courses and classes to help writers to enhance their skills on her Writing Genii website. She also provides inspiration and motivation for writers on her writing blogs. Angela has been writing successfully since the late 1970s, and was online in the 1980s, long before the birth of the Web. Her business books have been widely published.

The following two tabs change content below.
Angela Booth is a top copywriter, multi-published author, and writing teacher. She offers many guides, courses and classes to help writers to enhance their skills on her websites. She also provides inspiration and motivation for writers on her writing blogs. Angela has been writing successfully since the late 1970s, and was online in the 1980s, long before the birth of the Web. Her business books have been widely published.