Tag Archives: author

Self-Publishing Strategies: 5 Easy Ways To Promote Older Titles

Self-Publishing Strategies: 5 Easy Ways To Promote Older Titles

If you’ve been self-publishing for a while, your backlist is growing. You’re promoting your new releases, and over time, your backlist is left to fend for itself.

A couple of weeks ago a reader asked: “How do I promote my older books without spending money on advertising?”

Great question.

Self-publishing? Your books are available as long as you choose

One of the benefits of self-publishing is that your books are available forever, more or less. You can publish/ unpublish, edit and republish… Everything is up to you.

Keeping this in mind, that you can edit and republish at any time you choose, here are some strategies for promoting your self-published back catalogue.

1. Give an old title a makeover, and republish it

I’m a tinkerer, and I love hitting the PUBLISH button, whether it’s on a blog post, or a book.

One of the easiest ways to promote an older title is to edit it, and republish it. You can add new info (nonfiction) or a new chapter. With fiction, you can add scenes.

Remember to use the backmatter of all your titles for promotion. Add a (brief) preview of a recent release. Make sure that you’ve added a link to your website, and mailing list. Got many books? Develop a list of titles, and add the list to your entire back catalogue.

When I suggest a title makeover to students, they ask whether they should republish the book as a new title, or a new edition.

My rule of thumb:

  • More than 50% new content? It’s a new title. Unpublish the older title;
  • Less than 50% new? It’s a new edition of the title.

2. Change an older book’s cover to give it a fresh new look

This is the easiest way to promote an older title. Change the cover.

In some cases, this can have an enormous impact. One student changed the cover, and her book started selling copies every day. In her case, her new cover was more in line with her genre’s expectations, so the big uptick in sales made sense.

3. Update your most recent titles, with ads for your older books inside

When you publish a book, it’s done. You forget about it. However, always keep your backlist in mind.

See the first strategy, above. Advertise older titles in your new books, and add a list of all your titles to each book you publish.

4. Change the price on your older titles

Whatever the price you’re charging, change it. No, I don’t mean that you should lower the price of the book: increase it.

When I share this strategy with my students, they’re stunned. I encourage them to do it, assuring them that the sky won’t fall, and they’re even more stunned.

One student had a cozy mystery which hadn’t sold more than ten copies. He increased the price: now it sells, so he’s writing a series based on the characters… Go figure, right?

A side-benefit of increasing the price of older titles is that you can now afford to advertise them.

5. Pop a book into KDP Select for three months (or remove it from Select)

KDP Select is a conundrum. Some authors won’t have anything to do with it, and that’s OK. Other authors enroll everything in Select.

This is understandable. Some books do brilliantly in Select, others don’t.

Here’s what I suggest to new authors. If you’re publishing a novel, pop it into Select for three months, then go wide with it. When publishing nonfiction, go wide immediately.

With an older title, if it hasn’t been in Select for a year or more, pop it in for three months (be sure to give it a full or mini-makeover first), then take it out.

For older titles already in Select, take them out when their current three months is up, and give them a makeover, then publish them wide — and raise the price while you’re at it.

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Book coaching may well be the best investment you ever make in yourself and your future.

Yes, writing a book can be scary, but I’m happy to coach you through the process, just as I’ve coached many other authors.

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Self-Publishing Strategy Made Easy: How To Market Your Books In 15 Minutes A Day

Self-Publishing Strategy Made Easy: How To Market Your Books In 15 Minutes A Day

eBook: $5.99

Do you enjoy writing and publishing your books, but find that marketing them is a challenge? You're not sure what works, so your efforts are muddled, half-hearted, and inconsistent.

What if you could market in just 15 minutes daily?

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Nonfiction Ebooks Goldmine: Write and Sell Nonfiction Ebooks In 24 Hours Or Less

Nonfiction Ebooks Goldmine: Write and Sell Nonfiction Ebooks In 24 Hours Or Less

$5.99
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Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 5
Genre: Writing

You're a writer. You need to make money from your words. What if you could create AND sell a nonfiction book in just a day?

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New Author: 4 Tips To Help You To Write Your Novel

New Author: 4 Tips To Help You To Write Your Novel

You’re a new author, and you want to write a novel — a good novel. Perhaps you’ve already started writing.

You’re excited, and nervous. So far you’ve managed to shout down all those voices in your head which tell you that writing a novel is hard, that you don’t know enough, that you don’t have time… and on, and on.

Take this to heart: baby steps.

New author: want to finish your novel? Take daily baby steps

Nothing blocks a new author as quickly as the knowledge that he’s “writing a book.” Avoid thinking that.

Here’s why. Even a short novel contains at least 40,000 words. At 250 words a page, that’s 160 pages, give or take. A year from now, after you’ve written a book (or two books, if you catch fire) 40,000 words may seem easy-peasy. A stroll in the park.

However, for a new author, when the realization hits that you’ve written five pages and have 155 more to write, the thought of writing all those pages makes you cringe.

Instead:

  • Tell yourself you’re creating a title for a book you may want to write one day, or not…
  • Describe a character, who might appear in your hypothetical book, one day;
  • Imagine your new character in his daily life. Close your eyes. Can you see him? What’s he doing? Write it down.

Think “baby steps” — and write every day. It took me many years to stop thinking about “writing a novel”, and chunk a novel down into simple and easy daily tasks. Baby steps help you avoid drama and procrastination, and make writing easier.

Here are some tips to help you to write those words with brio.

1. Have fun: if you don’t have fun, readers won’t either

Many years ago, when I was writing my first novel, I though that writing was hard. Nevertheless, I love to read, so I was convinced that I could write a novel.

It took a multi-book contract from a major publisher before I realized that:

  • If I wasn’t having fun, or was bored, it came out in the words, which meant red slashes from my editor’s pencil, and rewrites; so…
  • I decided to have fun — to entertain myself.

Not only did the writing flow more smoothly when I was writing to entertain myself, I got far fewer slashes from the editorial pencil.

Moreover, I was eager to get to my desk to write each day.

Have fun.

2. Experience your novel, so that readers will too

In a similar vein, think of your novel as a series of experiences. Readers read to experience your novel.

In my career as a ghostwriter, occasionally someone asks me to write a horror novel, or a serial killer thriller. I refuse, because I can’t read those genres with pleasure. Why would I want to put myself through those kinds of experiences?

You’re a new author, so you’re very focused on the words of your novel. Make it your goal to get beyond the words as soon as you can. Aim to put your readers right into your novel, seeing through your main character’s eyes, to experience what he experiences.

3. It’s all about the characters: what’s your main character’s flaw?

From Characters in Fiction: Love Me, Love My Flaw:

How many people do you know who are perfect? No one’s perfect. We all have flaws – many of them. So characters in fiction need flaws too. Creating a flaw which works can be a real challenge, especially if you’re new to writing fiction.

While all characters are based on aspects of their creator, if you’re a new writer you’ll create characters who are Mary Sues or Marty Stus: idealized people, representations of yourself, and your counterpart of the opposite sex.

To avoid this, focus on a character’s flaw.

Here’s my favorite list of character traits. Pick a flaw (one or two for each character in your novel) which you can SHOW readers.

4. Ramp up the tension (you may not be able to do this in your first draft)

As a new author, your primary goal is to keep readers reading.

Here’s how. Use open loops.

From Write Fiction For Readers: 3 Tips For Narrative Drive:

Open loops are psychological strategies used most often as copywriting tricks. They’re hooks and unanswered questions. You can and should use open loops right throughout your novel.

Many novels use a rapid cutting technique of a series of cliffhangers — open loops. The author places a character in a tough spot, and leaves him there for a few scenes. When the author returns and rescues the character, he’s closing that loop, so he immediately opens another one.

As we’ve said, until you’re an experienced author, you’re unfamiliar with this strategy of writing to keep readers reading, so be happy to make this a goal when you write your second draft.

Also, in your reading, watch for open loops, and how authors use them.

And of course — have fun. 🙂

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

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Your readers want to enter your novel's world. They want to experience your book -- they want to live your book with your main characters.

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Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99

I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly.

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Writing Success Secrets: How To Conquer Self Doubt, And Achieve Your Writing Goals, Starting Today

Writing Success Secrets: How To Conquer Self Doubt, And Achieve Your Writing Goals, Starting Today

eBook: $5.99
Author:
Genre: Writing

Today, the opportunities for writers have never been greater. Back in the day a writer who was making six-figures a year seemed a creature of myth. These days, highly successful writers are making six figures a month.

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Fiction Writing Magic: Outlining And Connecting With Readers

Fiction Writing Magic: Outlining And Connecting With Readers

Readers have asked for more fiction writing tips on what to include when they’re outlining a novel. Here’s a big tip: connect with your plot, and with your characters. Sometimes, when we’re outlining, we focus on the plot so much that we forget why readers read.

Recently I’ve been working with an author who shocked me. She told me that she’s self-published three novels over three years, and has made NO sales at all. When I checked her books’ blurbs on Amazon (she’s published ebooks and paperbacks) I saw the problem immediately.

Plot, plot, and more plot, and no real connection to be found. Your stories need to connect with readers. This connection can be subtle, but as the saying goes, you know it when you see it. 🙂

Readers read for connection — they want to be drawn in to your novel, or short story… that connection MUST be there, in your blurb, and of course, in your outline, and in your books.

All very well, I’m sure you’re thinking… but how do you CONNECT?

Fiction writing tip: your fiction MUST connect with readers

Blurbs (book descriptions) to which readers connect sell books.

For example, the blurb for Nora Roberts’ novel Blue Smoke, begins:

Reena Hale has always understood the destructive power of fire.

Fire burns. We can relate. Just yesterday I burned my hand on a cast iron skillet. Ouch! (We’ll get to the senses and connection in a moment…)

Here’s another example, from the blurb for Joseph Finder’s novel, The Switch:

Michael Tanner is heading home from a business trip when he accidentally picks up the wrong laptop from security.

Have you ever picked up someone else’s bag? I haven’t, but last week I strolled into the supermarket car park, right up my car, and kept pressing the key in my hand in irritation.

Curses — why wasn’t the car unlocking?

Finally I realized. Heh, right color, make and model, but not my car…

We’ve all made similar mistakes. Finder makes a connection with readers, as Roberts does, in the first sentence of the blurb.

Want another example? Just check bestsellers. I defy you to find me a blurb which doesn’t connect with readers in some way. Here’s another example, this one is from David Baldacci’s End Game: A Will Robie Novel 5. And again, we find connection right in the first line of the blurb:

London is on red alert.

We connect with that. We watch the news of terrorist attacks in London, and we feel vulnerable too.

In this article on outlining fiction, I suggested that you start outlining with an image:

… start with an image: an image has built-in emotion – if you choose the right image. Fiction is all about emotion. No emotion? You’ve got nothing. Your idea, no matter how wonderful, will fizzle out. Or you’ll have a bunch of weird emotions tumbling around, which you can’t get a handle on… and the novel or short story fizzles out.

Let’s add to that: start with an image to which you respond.

Then:

  • Think about the emotion the image inspires; and
  • Think about how that connects with readers; and
  • WRITE DOWN that connection in your outline.

1. Outlining: connect via conflict — remember emotions

Fiction is all conflict, all the time. It’s easy to forget the reader connection, and create melodrama.

Let’s say that you’re great with conflict. Everyone’s upset in your novel, and fighting with everyone else.

Good work. Now make an emotional connection with your character, a highly intelligent, 30-year-old, brand new detective. She’s been taken off a case. How does she feel? Add a note about those feelings, right in your outline for the scene.

Add another note: how do you want the reader to feel? If your detective is your primary point of view character, you want your reader to empathize with the character.

2. Look for opportunities for sensory writing in your outlines: connect via the senses

Readers will connect with your fiction if you provide sensory details.

Take a moment, and glance around the room, or around the plane or around the park… You’re somewhere, aren’t you? And as long as you’re awake, you’re aware of your environment, on some level. You’re using your senses: sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch.

Proust’s madeleines (biscuits) are famous, because the sense of taste is linked to memory:

The madeleine anecdote is considered one of the key passages in À La Recherche du Temps Perdu or In Search of Lost Time. It is at the heart of the book’s main theme of involuntary memory…

Readers will connect if you make it easy for them to experience your characters’ environment, via the senses. Don’t describe everything, but do choose sensory details which connect with readers.

From Georgette Heyer’s Frederica:

Wiser counsels had not prevailed with Jane: she had been determined on roses and pink gauze; and as she had inherited her mother’s shrewish disposition, and was capable of sulking for days together, Lady Buxted had allowed her to have them.

If Heyer had written: “Jane sulked until she got a dress with roses and pink gauze,” it wouldn’t have the same impact. Nevertheless the “sulking” makes a connection with readers; we all know people like Jane who want their own way.

3. YOU are your fiction: connect to your characters, and to the events in your plot

You’re your fiction. No one else has your emotional makeup or experiences. You perceive the world differently from everyone else. So, in order to connect with readers, connect with your characters, via your imagination. Then get that connection onto the page. Readers will latch onto your fiction — you helped them to make a connection.

An author’s biggest danger when we create characters and plot, is forgetting to make a connection with our characters, and the disasters we create for them.

Once you begin looking for connections readers might make, you’ll find them in your writing and in others’, and will create them deliberately.

You’ll know that you’re doing it right when you have fun with your fiction. 🙂

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99

I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly.

More info →
Buy from Apple iBooks
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Inktera
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

eBook: $5.99

You can, when you discover the secrets of writing blurbs (book descriptions) which sell.

More info →
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Inktera
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Apple iBooks
Buy from Amazon Kindle

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out our ebooks for writers.