Tag Archives: authors

New Novelist: 4 Tips To Help You Avoid Fiction’s Common Pitfalls

New Novelist: 4 Tips To Help You Avoid Fiction’s Common Pitfalls

You’re a new novelist, writing your first book. Kudos to you. Yes, writing a novel can be intimidating, so avoid thinking about all the words you need to write.

Focus only on the words you’ll write today. Do that tomorrow as well — do it every day. As long as you’re moving forward, you’re making progress.

You’re a new novelist: map the terrain

We’ve talked about a novel’s milestones. Be aware that you must hit them:

The setup (at the 25 per cent point of the novel);

The midpoint, where everything changes, at 50 per cent;

The OOPS milestone: the kick in the pants. Think of it as a sharp jolt, or the dark moment. It occurs at the 80 per cent point.

The climax: the BIG scene, in which the hero does battle for what he wants. Alternatively (in mysteries for example), the big reveal — the sleuth unmasks the killer. You should hit this at the 90 per cent point.

Read the complete article. It’s vital that you understand the terrain of your novel.

Now let’s look at the tips.

1. Keep going, even if you get a “better idea” for a new novel

Everyone gets ideas. Writing begets ideas.

Unfortunately an idea for a new novel can seem like a solution when you’ve hit a challenging scene, or think your novel’s running off the rails. It’s tempting to trash your current novel and begin something new.

Your idea is a mirage. Write it on a sticky note, and look at it tomorrow. It’s doubtful that it will look as wonderful tomorrow as it does today.

Ideas are nothing in themselves. No single idea can support a complete novel. Create a Collection for new ideas in your novel’s bullet journal, and get back to writing.

2. Recognize “the wall” and bulldoze through it

Every novel hits the wall sooner or later.

Suddenly you hate your novel. You want your characters dead. You’re certain that your plot is the biggest load of trash any author has ever tried to foist onto an unsuspecting public…

This feeling of hatred is another mirage. Just like the “better idea” mirage, it’s not real. My walls usually loom up at around 25,000 words. I’ve no idea why.

From Writing A Novel You Hate: 3 Tips To Help You To Keep Writing:

When you hit the wall, you’ll know it. It’s a deep, visceral dislike for your book. As we’ve said, it’s not a bad novel just because you hate it at this moment in time.

Keep writing, even if it takes you an hour to produce a paragraph. Read through what you’ve written, and write.

Avoid the thought that: “I just need to wait for inspiration”. Trust me, when you hit the wall, inspiration won’t come. You’ve got to go through it, so be brave. Grit your teeth if you must, but write anyway.

3. Make your fiction real by using your senses

Where are you?

Look around for a moment. Perhaps you’re in a coffee shop. What can you see, smell, hear, touch?

Practice grounding yourself in this way several times a day, so that you can do the same in your fiction. You make your fiction real by putting the reader into your novel, right into the action, via his senses.

4. Yes, you really do need a “story question”

I was chatting with a new novelist the other week. He’d lost faith in his story question, and want to know whether he really needed one? He’s writing a science fiction space opera, and wanted to get on with the next galactic battle in the novel.

Yes, you do need a story question. 🙂

No matter how episodic your tale, something keeps your main character going, and that’s the story question. You’ve planted this question (we hope) sometime in the setup phase — the first 25% of your novel.

Maybe your character’s beset by vampires, or accused of murder, or wants something desperately. Maybe it’s a coming of age story, and your character’s troubles and travails help him to grow up.

Your character has goals. Aways. He must achieve those goals or die, literally, or metaphorically.

My new novelist friend wasn’t aware of the suspense devices you can use to bring the story question alive — both for you, and for your readers.

In this article, I offered some suggestions for devices, like the ticking clock, you can use to create suspense in your fiction:

… let’s say you’re writing a thriller, and a child goes missing. Every minute counts — the longer a child remains missing the less chance there is that the child will be found alive.

Your main character is a detective. You could start your chapters: Missing Three Hours… Missing Five Hours, etc.

In the “missing child” story, your story question might not concern the child at all. Maybe your main character is a female detective. Everything’s gone wrong for her. She wants to quit. The story question, which you might never state explicitly, is: will she overcome all her challenges and stay in her job?

As long as you know what the story question is, you’re good. It’s common for the story question to change several times. When it does, go back and revise, so that the your question fits seamlessly into your novel.

Plan, Write, And Publish Serial Fiction In Four Weeks

Plan, Write, And Publish Serial Fiction In Four Weeks

eBook: $5.99

Why write serial fiction?

Everyone's busy today. A serial is by its nature, faster to write, and publish, than a novel.

It's a quicker read too, and many readers appreciate this. While a reader may hesitate before committing hours to a novel, he can read an episode of your serial in minutes.

If you’re a new author, a serial serves to introduce you to readers. A reader may not be willing to commit to a novel by a new author, but be willing to read an episode of a serial.

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Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99

I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly.

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Plot Hot-Selling Fiction The Easy Way

Plot Hot-Selling Fiction The Easy Way

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Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 3
Genre: Writing

How To Write Novels And Short Stories Readers Love: You're about to discover the easiest, fastest, and most fun plotting method ever. You can use it for all your fiction, whether you're writing short stories, novellas or novels. Take control of your fiction now, and publish more, more easily.

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If You Want To Write A Novel But Can’t Get Started: 3 Tips

If You Want To Write A Novel But Can’t Get Started: 3 Tips

Last week I chatted with a new author who told me that she’d always wanted to write a novel. “It’s been my dream for 20 years,” she said. “I always thought I’d write, but something’s holding me back. I don’t know what it is… my children have left home, so I can’t tell myself that I don’t have time any more.”

Desperation’s the key for many authors. They want to write, and don’t write. Then something tips them over the edge. One fine day they decide that they’ll start writing now. And they do.

Let’s make today the day YOU start.

You CAN write a novel, even without an idea in your head

Oddly enough, “ideas” are a challenge for many authors. They either have too many ideas, and can’t pick one, or they “can’t think of an idea.”

My new author friend was in the latter group. “I can’t come up with a great idea,” she told me. “Every idea I come up with is stupid.”

Ideas are over-rated. It’s easy to come up with ideas. You can do it — challenge yourself to come up with ten ideas in ten minutes. You’ll do it, even if you loudly proclaim that you can’t think of an idea.

Here’s the thing. A novel requires more than an idea. It needs thousands of ideas. Start writing, and you’ll come up with dozens of ideas in a single session.

These three tips will help you to get started.

1. Write 100 words about someone’s secret

Fiction is people, and people are endlessly fascinating.

Do you have a secret? We all have a secret we’d hate to see splattered all over the Internet, or on the front page of a newspaper.

You can write 100 words about any secret: your secret, your mother’s secret, a friend’s secret… or an imaginary character’s secret.

Sit down at your computer now, and start writing.

STOP when you’ve written 100 words.

Why stop? Because you’re training yourself to write on demand. Writers write, just like bakers bake and doctors see their patients. It’s no big deal — your aim is to demystify the act of writing. So stop when you’ve written your 100 words. 🙂

2. Write 200 words about your favorite movie or book character

Write whatever comes to mind about your favorite.

Don’t judge your words — when a word pops into your head, write it down. That’s what writers do — they think on the computer screen. Then they knock their thoughts (words) into shape — again, on the computer screen.

(Or on paper — whatever floats your boat.)

Want more exercises? Here you go. You’ll find 70 writing exercises in my ebook, Top 70 Writing Tips: Write More, Improve Your Writing, And Make More Money. You can do many of the exercises over and over again.

You may be shocked that I occasionally do the exercises too. Writing exercises are an excellent way to kickstart your creativity whenever you feel stale, or “not in the mood” to write.

3. Write for ten minutes a day, every day

This tip is the biggie.

Schedule ten minutes of writing on your novel, every day. Write whatever comes. Write character descriptions, character names, a scene… Write. For ten minutes. Then stop.

Sooner or later, your confidence will be such that you won’t need to force yourself to your computer. You’ll leap out of bed in the morning, and will be impatient to write.

Write a novel: write every day… Don’t worry about writing when you’re not writing

Sadly, there’s nothing glamorous about the writing life. Writers sit down and write, every day. Or every week day.

When they’re not writing, they live their life.

To start to write a novel, and finish it, do the exercises.

Start now.

Angela Booth’s Top 70 Writing Tips: Write More, Improve Your Writing, And Make More Money

Angela Booth’s Top 70 Writing Tips: Write More, Improve Your Writing, And Make More Money

$5.99
Author:
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing process

What's holding you back from the writing career of your dreams? If you want to write more, sell more, and have more fun writing... it's easier than you can imagine. Discover the secret to writing every day, and becoming a prolific writer.

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Writing Success Secrets: How To Conquer Self Doubt, And Achieve Your Writing Goals, Starting Today

Writing Success Secrets: How To Conquer Self Doubt, And Achieve Your Writing Goals, Starting Today

eBook: $5.99
Author:
Genre: Writing

Today, the opportunities for writers have never been greater. Back in the day a writer who was making six-figures a year seemed a creature of myth. These days, highly successful writers are making six figures a month.

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Resources to build your writing career

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Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.

Book Marketing: Should You Blog Your Novel?

Book Marketing: Should You Blog Your Novel?

A reader contacted me to ask whether you should “blog your novel.”

That’s an interesting question. Before 2007, I’d have said yes.

Today, I lean on the side of no, if you intend posting complete scenes and chapters of your rough draft.

Times have changed. Years ago, author Kate Moss blogged her bestseller Labyrinth, and I wrote in 2007:

I love big historical novels, and was engrossed by Labyrinth, Kate Mosse’s bestseller. It also intrigued me that this bestseller was blogged, because I adore blogging, and recommend it to writers.

Today, I don’t recommend posting your complete novel. Amazon kickstarted the self-publishing revolution when it released the Kindle in 2007, and that changed things.

Use a site like Wattpad. Or you could upload the manuscript to Amazon’s Kindle Scout. Either of these options would provide a better book marketing option for a new author than creating a blog.

Of course, an established blog is valuable. If you’re an author with an established blog and following, jump right in, and publish snippets of your novel while you’re writing. You’d need to build an audience on Wattpad and Kindle Scout — why bother when you already have an audience on your blog?

My own preference, for book marketing today, is to publish to KDP Select.

Book marketing with Amazon’s KDP Select

Here’s why I prefer using KDP Select for book marketing, rather than blogging a new novel:

  • You’re marketing directly to your potential readers. Book buyers are on Amazon — or on Facebook, then on Amazon. Unfortunately Facebook has pretty much crippled the value of author pages (this was always going to happen… which is why I recommend blogging to authors);
  • You can market your other books in your novel’s back matter by providing an excerpt — or excerpts (but don’t overdo it.) Even if you’re a brand new author, you can market your mailing list in the back matter.

A couple of my pen names have well-established blogs, and followings, but I wouldn’t consider publishing a novel-in-progress to either of them. I’d rather publish straight to KDP Select for the above reasons.

Of course, your mileage may vary.

Your author blog will stand you in good stead for years to come, so by all means create one. Over time, it will become highly valuable to you — it’s an ideal book marketing venue. Book marketing options come and go. You control what happens on your blog.

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

eBook: $5.99

You can, when you discover the secrets of writing blurbs (book descriptions) which sell.

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Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

$4.99
Author:
Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 4
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

You want to write a novel. Perhaps you can't get started. Or maybe you got started, and then you stopped.You need a plan, broken down into easy steps. This program began as a 30-day challenge which I organized for readers in 2010. Hundreds of writers joined the challenge and completed it. They wrote novels.

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Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.