Tag Archives: authors

Book Marketing: Should You Blog Your Novel?

Book Marketing: Should You Blog Your Novel?

A reader contacted me to ask whether you should “blog your novel.”

That’s an interesting question. Before 2007, I’d have said yes.

Today, I lean on the side of no, if you intend posting complete scenes and chapters of your rough draft.

Times have changed. Years ago, author Kate Moss blogged her bestseller Labyrinth, and I wrote in 2007:

I love big historical novels, and was engrossed by Labyrinth, Kate Mosse’s bestseller. It also intrigued me that this bestseller was blogged, because I adore blogging, and recommend it to writers.

Today, I don’t recommend posting your complete novel. Amazon kickstarted the self-publishing revolution when it released the Kindle in 2007, and that changed things.

Use a site like Wattpad. Or you could upload the manuscript to Amazon’s Kindle Scout. Either of these options would provide a better book marketing option for a new author than creating a blog.

Of course, an established blog is valuable. If you’re an author with an established blog and following, jump right in, and publish snippets of your novel while you’re writing. You’d need to build an audience on Wattpad and Kindle Scout — why bother when you already have an audience on your blog?

My own preference, for book marketing today, is to publish to KDP Select.

Book marketing with Amazon’s KDP Select

Here’s why I prefer using KDP Select for book marketing, rather than blogging a new novel:

  • You’re marketing directly to your potential readers. Book buyers are on Amazon — or on Facebook, then on Amazon. Unfortunately Facebook has pretty much crippled the value of author pages (this was always going to happen… which is why I recommend blogging to authors);
  • You can market your other books in your novel’s back matter by providing an excerpt — or excerpts (but don’t overdo it.) Even if you’re a brand new author, you can market your mailing list in the back matter.

A couple of my pen names have well-established blogs, and followings, but I wouldn’t consider publishing a novel-in-progress to either of them. I’d rather publish straight to KDP Select for the above reasons.

Of course, your mileage may vary.

Your author blog will stand you in good stead for years to come, so by all means create one. Over time, it will become highly valuable to you — it’s an ideal book marketing venue. Book marketing options come and go. You control what happens on your blog.

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

eBook: $5.99

You can, when you discover the secrets of writing blurbs (book descriptions) which sell.

More info →
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Inktera
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Apple iBooks
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

$4.99
Author:
Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 4
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

You want to write a novel. Perhaps you can't get started. Or maybe you got started, and then you stopped.You need a plan, broken down into easy steps. This program began as a 30-day challenge which I organized for readers in 2010. Hundreds of writers joined the challenge and completed it. They wrote novels.

More info →

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.

3 Hot Writing Tips For Writing Romance Fiction

 3 Hot Writing Tips For Writing Romance Fiction

Romance fiction is fiction’s most popular genre (category), and has been for decades. So let’s look at three essential writing tips for this genre.

I don’t say “essential” lightly. Authors want to write romance because it’s so popular… but, they want to be improve things. Nasty “formulas” are not for them. They want to rescue romance readers from their own folly.

Listen up, please… I’m begging here. If you want your books to sell, write what readers want to read, not what you want to write.

Essential writing tips for writing romance

The argument starts something like this…

“My romance doesn’t have a happy ending,” an author tells me.

“A happy ending — Happy Ever After (HEA) or at least Happy For Now (HFN) is essential for the romance genres,” I respond.

“Yes, but…”

“Sorry… but if you don’t have a happy ending, you’re writing women’s fiction, not romance.”

Unfortunately, the arguments never end when it comes to commercial romance fiction. Let’s look at our tips.

1. Read romance fiction — VITAL

Many years ago, way back when I was a happy little author-to-be, I read lots of Mills & Boon, and said to myself, “anyone can write this junk, even I.”

Well, I was wrong, and right.

What I did right was read. But I was WAY wrong about the “anyone.”

Here’s the thing. Even though I thought the little romance books were junk, I got a kick out of reading them. They were entertaining — fun to read, and I raced through them.

Moreover, I knew that I could write them. It took me just three months to get a contract for a romance novel series from a major British publisher at that time.

Please understand this important truth: I knew what I was reading, BUT I wasn’t contemptuous of the books.

That’s the tip: READ. If you try to write what you don’t or can’t read and enjoy, your romance fiction will fail.

Yes, you may hit the jackpot like the Jane Austen and zombies book managed to do, but that’s not a romance. The zombies are the entertainment in that book.

2. Write what readers want to read: a happy ending is essential

See above. Everything in romance fiction leads to a happy ending. You’re writing entertainments, as we’ve said. Your books are read by smart people (mainly women, yes) who want to escape their lives for a few hours.

Don’t want a happy ending? Fine. Write whatever you like. But don’t try to palm your words off as “romance”, when you’re not writing romance.

For success… write what readers want to read. (And as we’ve said, and I’ll repeat — read so you know what readers want.)

3. Romance fiction is ALL about the emotion

You’ll take a huge step forward in your fiction writing career when you realize that readers read for the experiences. For the feelings. Readers of horror novels want to be scared witless, mystery readers want clues so that they can find out whodunit — none of this is news.

Romance readers want… Yep. Romance.

Funnily enough, I’m writing this on Valentine’s Day. 😉

Please follow these essential writing tips

You can write whatever you want to write today.

The gatekeepers have gone. However, do remember that you’re writing for readers, who want a specific experience when they read fiction. Please give them those experiences — you’ll sell more. And do remember to write a happy ending for your romances. 🙂

Heart To Heart: Romance Writing For Beginners

Heart To Heart: Romance Writing For Beginners

eBook: $5.99
Author:
Series: Romance Writing, Book 1
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

Love makes the world go round, and of all the genres in fiction, romance, with its many sub-genres, is the most popular.

More info →
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Inktera
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Apple iBooks
Buy from Amazon Kindle
More Heart To Heart: Write Hot-Selling Romance Fiction

More Heart To Heart: Write Hot-Selling Romance Fiction

eBook: $5.99
Author:
Series: Romance Writing, Book 2
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

I adore writing romance fiction, and now you can write romance too.

More info →
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Inktera
Buy from Apple iBooks
Buy from Amazon Kindle

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.

Write And Sell: 5 Social Media Tips For Book Marketing

Write And Sell: 5 Social Media Tips For Book Marketing

Oh the horror… Many authors hate book marketing, and they aren’t that keen on social media either. Authors want to write, and leave everything else to others.

Would that we could. That would be the best of all worlds. Sadly, even if you have the money to pay a good publicist, you’re better off doing most of your marketing yourself. No one knows your novels (and nonfiction books) as well as you do.

You’ll learn a great deal from marketing too. This helps your writing.

So — is social media useful, or useless, for book marketing?

Social media marketing: slow growth, then a healthy, ongoing harvest

Important: be aware that NO form of marketing is an ATM machine.

I posted about visibility on the freelance writing blog:

… (some) writers think of marketing in terms of “launches”. That is, they believe that marketing is something that you do for a few weeks a year whenever you have something new to promote.

… It works for a lucky few. For the vast majority of writers however, launches produce a tiny number of sales or none at all.

Look at marketing in general, and social media in particular, as a cumulative process. Just because no one’s bought your book in a week, after you posted on Twitter FIVE times, it doesn’t mean that no one’s seeing your tweets. (Try posting something stupid, and the instant response will provide a quick reality check. :-))

A reader may need to see mention of your book several times before he clicks through to your book’s product page on Amazon or elsewhere.

Now let’s look at the tips.

1. Invest in assets: create or buy great images

Images sell — seriously.

I know we’re all about the words, but people can’t read your words if they’re not paying attention. You grab their attention via images.

2. Create a plan to build your audience, reader by reader

Social media is social. You attract readers individually.

When you’re just starting out (and afterward too) think in terms of small wins. One response to a tweet; a like on your Facebook page… two followers on Pinterest.

3. Leverage others’ audiences with great content

Guest posting on other authors’ blogs used to be super-effective. Now, not so much. However, it’s still valuable. Leverage others’ audiences to grow your own.

4. Write and promote: promote your books before publishing day

You publish your book, and then promote it, yes?

No — if you do that, you’re missing out on a huge opportunity to build anticipation and readers before you publish.

I gave you a mini marketing campaign for social media on this post. Use that as a template to create your own publishing plan; start when you start writing your book.

5. The 80/ 20 rule: remember to promote your books on social media

Marketing on social media is a balance. If every post you make is promotional, you’ll never sell. On the other hand, if you’re too shy to sell, you’ll sell a lot fewer books than you could.

The 80/ 20 rule is popular in social media marketing. That is, for every four items you post, one is promotional. The other items provide information or entertainment.

You don’t have to adhere slavishly to the rule, but do remember that you’re marketing on social media to sell books.

Onward — book marketing on social media works if you do. 🙂

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

eBook: $5.99

You can, when you discover the secrets of writing blurbs (book descriptions) which sell.

More info →
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Inktera
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Apple iBooks
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99

I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly.

More info →
Buy from Apple iBooks
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Inktera
Buy from Amazon Kindle

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.