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3 Hot Writing Tips For Writing Romance Fiction

 3 Hot Writing Tips For Writing Romance Fiction

Romance fiction is fiction’s most popular genre (category), and has been for decades. So let’s look at three essential writing tips for this genre.

I don’t say “essential” lightly. Authors want to write romance because it’s so popular… but, they want to be improve things. Nasty “formulas” are not for them. They want to rescue romance readers from their own folly.

Listen up, please… I’m begging here. If you want your books to sell, write what readers want to read, not what you want to write.

Essential writing tips for writing romance

The argument starts something like this…

“My romance doesn’t have a happy ending,” an author tells me.

“A happy ending — Happy Ever After (HEA) or at least Happy For Now (HFN) is essential for the romance genres,” I respond.

“Yes, but…”

“Sorry… but if you don’t have a happy ending, you’re writing women’s fiction, not romance.”

Unfortunately, the arguments never end when it comes to commercial romance fiction. Let’s look at our tips.

1. Read romance fiction — VITAL

Many years ago, way back when I was a happy little author-to-be, I read lots of Mills & Boon, and said to myself, “anyone can write this junk, even I.”

Well, I was wrong, and right.

What I did right was read. But I was WAY wrong about the “anyone.”

Here’s the thing. Even though I thought the little romance books were junk, I got a kick out of reading them. They were entertaining — fun to read, and I raced through them.

Moreover, I knew that I could write them. It took me just three months to get a contract for a romance novel series from a major British publisher at that time.

Please understand this important truth: I knew what I was reading, BUT I wasn’t contemptuous of the books.

That’s the tip: READ. If you try to write what you don’t or can’t read and enjoy, your romance fiction will fail.

Yes, you may hit the jackpot like the Jane Austen and zombies book managed to do, but that’s not a romance. The zombies are the entertainment in that book.

2. Write what readers want to read: a happy ending is essential

See above. Everything in romance fiction leads to a happy ending. You’re writing entertainments, as we’ve said. Your books are read by smart people (mainly women, yes) who want to escape their lives for a few hours.

Don’t want a happy ending? Fine. Write whatever you like. But don’t try to palm your words off as “romance”, when you’re not writing romance.

For success… write what readers want to read. (And as we’ve said, and I’ll repeat — read so you know what readers want.)

3. Romance fiction is ALL about the emotion

You’ll take a huge step forward in your fiction writing career when you realize that readers read for the experiences. For the feelings. Readers of horror novels want to be scared witless, mystery readers want clues so that they can find out whodunit — none of this is news.

Romance readers want… Yep. Romance.

Funnily enough, I’m writing this on Valentine’s Day. 😉

Please follow these essential writing tips

You can write whatever you want to write today.

The gatekeepers have gone. However, do remember that you’re writing for readers, who want a specific experience when they read fiction. Please give them those experiences — you’ll sell more. And do remember to write a happy ending for your romances. 🙂

Heart To Heart: Romance Writing For Beginners

Heart To Heart: Romance Writing For Beginners

eBook: $5.99
Author:
Series: Romance Writing, Book 1
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

Love makes the world go round, and of all the genres in fiction, romance, with its many sub-genres, is the most popular.

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More Heart To Heart: Write Hot-Selling Romance Fiction

More Heart To Heart: Write Hot-Selling Romance Fiction

eBook: $5.99
Author:
Series: Romance Writing, Book 2
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

I adore writing romance fiction, and now you can write romance too.

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Write And Sell: 5 Social Media Tips For Book Marketing

Write And Sell: 5 Social Media Tips For Book Marketing

Oh the horror… Many authors hate book marketing, and they aren’t that keen on social media either. Authors want to write, and leave everything else to others.

Would that we could. That would be the best of all worlds. Sadly, even if you have the money to pay a good publicist, you’re better off doing most of your marketing yourself. No one knows your novels (and nonfiction books) as well as you do.

You’ll learn a great deal from marketing too. This helps your writing.

So — is social media useful, or useless, for book marketing?

Social media marketing: slow growth, then a healthy, ongoing harvest

Important: be aware that NO form of marketing is an ATM machine.

I posted about visibility on the freelance writing blog:

… (some) writers think of marketing in terms of “launches”. That is, they believe that marketing is something that you do for a few weeks a year whenever you have something new to promote.

… It works for a lucky few. For the vast majority of writers however, launches produce a tiny number of sales or none at all.

Look at marketing in general, and social media in particular, as a cumulative process. Just because no one’s bought your book in a week, after you posted on Twitter FIVE times, it doesn’t mean that no one’s seeing your tweets. (Try posting something stupid, and the instant response will provide a quick reality check. :-))

A reader may need to see mention of your book several times before he clicks through to your book’s product page on Amazon or elsewhere.

Now let’s look at the tips.

1. Invest in assets: create or buy great images

Images sell — seriously.

I know we’re all about the words, but people can’t read your words if they’re not paying attention. You grab their attention via images.

2. Create a plan to build your audience, reader by reader

Social media is social. You attract readers individually.

When you’re just starting out (and afterward too) think in terms of small wins. One response to a tweet; a like on your Facebook page… two followers on Pinterest.

3. Leverage others’ audiences with great content

Guest posting on other authors’ blogs used to be super-effective. Now, not so much. However, it’s still valuable. Leverage others’ audiences to grow your own.

4. Write and promote: promote your books before publishing day

You publish your book, and then promote it, yes?

No — if you do that, you’re missing out on a huge opportunity to build anticipation and readers before you publish.

I gave you a mini marketing campaign for social media on this post. Use that as a template to create your own publishing plan; start when you start writing your book.

5. The 80/ 20 rule: remember to promote your books on social media

Marketing on social media is a balance. If every post you make is promotional, you’ll never sell. On the other hand, if you’re too shy to sell, you’ll sell a lot fewer books than you could.

The 80/ 20 rule is popular in social media marketing. That is, for every four items you post, one is promotional. The other items provide information or entertainment.

You don’t have to adhere slavishly to the rule, but do remember that you’re marketing on social media to sell books.

Onward — book marketing on social media works if you do. 🙂

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

eBook: $5.99

You can, when you discover the secrets of writing blurbs (book descriptions) which sell.

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Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99

I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly.

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Resources to build your writing career

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Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.

Write A Book: 3 Simple Ways To Get Nonfiction Ideas Readers Love

Write A Book: 3 Simple Ways To Get Nonfiction Ideas Readers Love

You want to write a book. Specifically, you want to write a nonfiction book. Easy — ideas are everywhere.

You’re keen to get started, but every idea you develop seems trite — uninspired. You’re wondering whether you’ll ever come up with something original.

Hey, listen up… “Original” is over-rated. Let’s say you managed to develop a completely different idea for a book… An idea which no one has ever had before.

Amazing, right? A guaranteed bestseller, right? Wrong.

Hundreds of thousands of writers all over the world are cudgeling their brains and looking for ideas too. Not only is it unlikely that you’ll come up with something that no one has ever thought of before, but if you did somehow manage it, chances are that no one would buy your book.

Decide now that you’ll write a book which will sell: the only way to do that is to write what readers want.

Write a book that people want to read

Recall that you’re not just writing a book, you’re writing a book that people will want to read.

When I started my writing career, more years ago than I care to remember, a savvy editor suggested that if I wanted to sell, I write about: diets, romance, and money. That trio of topics will always be popular, because: human nature.

Let’s look at ways you can get ideas and write books that readers will love.

1. Make a list of what fascinates YOU

It’s not what you know, it’s what you love, and want to learn more about.

Before the Kindle and the self-publishing revolution, authors’ research to find ideas for books was time-consuming. Not only did you need to hustle to the library to study databases of books which were already published, you had to source lists of upcoming titles as well.

All that took time, and convincing editors that you’d found a hot topic took a lot of back and forth. Even remembering those long-ago days makes me tired. 🙂

Today, you have millions of potential readers, and those millions of readers have endless interests. No matter how esoteric your own obsessions are, it’s likely that thousands of readers share those obsessions and will want to read about them.

So make a list of what you love (or hate, come to that) and keep adding to it. The list will serve you well in years to come.

2. What problems can you solve?

Everyone is an expert on something, and nothing is ever lost on a writer.

Make a list of what you know. Consider your history, your job history, personal challenges you’ve overcome… You’ll be surprised at the length of the list, no matter how young you are. Of course, if you’re mature, you know even more.

Share your knowledge.

3. What do you do in your spare time? You’re a fan of…

What do you like to do?

Create another list. This list should include everything you’d do if money were no object, as well as your favorite pastimes.

Your three lists: competition analysis

You now have three lists.

Choose five to ten topics, and do a little competition analysis.

From this early-stage analysis, you want to know:

  • The category: how popular is the topic? Do any books covering the topic appear in Amazon’s Top 100 Best Sellers? Here’s the Top 100 for 2017.
  • Assuming that your category is represented, are the books indie published, or traditionally published? Traditionally published books are a good sign, because publishers have research resources that we don’t. (Don’t take this too seriously — publishers are often wrong. :-))
  • Potential for a shortie title. Can you come up some shortie topics with which you can test the category’s potential? Writing a couple of short titles makes sense, before you spend several months writing.

If you want to write a book, there are a million nonfiction topics

As we’ve said, with millions upon millions of readers, chances are that thousands of them will be interested in any idea you choose.

Have fun. And keep adding to your lists. Then you’ll never run out of great ideas for great books. 🙂

Yes, You’re Creative: How To Unlock Your Imagination And Build The Writing Career Of Your Dreams

Yes, You’re Creative: How To Unlock Your Imagination And Build The Writing Career Of Your Dreams

eBook: $5.99

In this book we'll aim to increase your creativity to unlock your imagination and build the writing career of your dreams.

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Nonfiction Ebooks Goldmine: Write and Sell Nonfiction Ebooks In 24 Hours Or Less

Nonfiction Ebooks Goldmine: Write and Sell Nonfiction Ebooks In 24 Hours Or Less

$5.99
Author:
Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 5
Genre: Writing

You're a writer. You need to make money from your words. What if you could create AND sell a nonfiction book in just a day?

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Resources to build your writing career

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Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.