Tag Archives: guidelines

Can’t get started writing your novel?

Novels take commitment. A book you can read in three hours can take anywhere from three months to three years to write.

Here’s a cute idea for you if you can’t get started writing: use Twitter.

How to Start a Twitter Novel suggest a plan to write a “Twitter novel”:

“1. Throw Out The Manuscript

Twitter is instantaneous. Serializing a manuscript may be easy, but trying to contract and make logical sense of it in 140 character bursts is not. By doing this, you limit the flexibility that Twitter grants in presenting your fiction. Start fresh.”

Now, of itself, a Twitter novel may be close to useless. However, it can provide you with inspiration to write if you outline your “real” novel 140 characters a time in Twitter.

Responses from your followers will help.

Recession-proof your freelance writing career

“Write More And Make More Money From Your Writing: Develop A Fast, Fun Productive Writing Process” gives you all the tools you need for a thriving writing career, no matter what the economic climate.

Three weeks after completing the class one student wrote:

“Thanks Angela, for all your help and advice in class. I’m quitting my job next week. I printed out my letter of resignation tonight after landing a contract writing job that will pay me more for three months part-time work than I earned in from my day job in the whole of 2007! You were right – the great gigs are out there, and now I’ve got the skills to land them. Your class opened my eyes. Bless you…”

“Write More And Make More Money From Your Writing: Develop A Fast, Fun Productive Writing Process” shows you how to thrive as a freelance writer. Would you like to write five times more than you’re writing now, and sell to higher-paying markets? Take the class.

Sell your book — start before you write it

Many writers write their book, and then start to sell it. This is going about the process the wrong way.

The time to start selling your book is as you write it. This applies whether you’re writing a book for a traditional publisher, or you’re self-publishing an ebook or hardcover book.

In the article Fast ebooks — you can do it too — Angela Booth’s Fab Freelance Writing Blog I reported on the process I’m following for a new ebook I’m writing:

“1. I bought a domain name as soon as I got the idea;

2. I transferred the DNS to my Web host, and set up a ‘coming soon’ index page, with an article on the topic of the ebook. This is so the site gets indexed; I want it to be indexed before the ebook’s ready;

3. I’ve started creating graphics for the site and ebook. Yes, I could outsource the graphics. However, I enjoy doing it, and my graphics guy disappointed me with unusable graphics the last time I outsourced, so there’s less hassle in doing it myself. And, as I create the graphics, I can feel my enthusiasm building…;

4. I outlined the ebook in ten minutes. I’ve been writing articles on the topic so I already know what I want to say;”

If you want your book to sell, and sell well, you must start selling it… as you write it.

So if you’re currently writing a book, and haven’t thought about how you’ll sell it (you’ll need to sell it, even if you’re going the traditional publishing route) start today.

Write It Once And Sell It Forever

Get A Constant Flow Of Cash By Writing And Selling Ebooks… It’s Much, Much Easier Than You Think

Ebooks are BIG online. Most ebooks contain from five to 100 pages, and sell anywhere from $10 to $100 dollars, and over, depending on the information. Clever writers are realizing that there’s gold in ebooks, and that they’re well-placed to mine that gold…

Discover how you can self-publish online, and make a great income, writing and selling ebooks with “Write and Sell an eBook: Every Writer’s Quick-Action Guide To Writing Ebooks”..

Write a Book Without Writers Block

Got writer’s block? If you’re writing a book, you’re almost guaranteed to get writer’s block at some stage. This shouldn’t slow you down, it’s a good thing, believe it or not.

There are many reasons you could be suffering from writer’s block, but knowing why you are isn’t as important as moving forward with your book.

The five-step process I’ve described for you below will help you to get over writer’s block. On the other hand, if you’re planning a book, it will get you started without procrastinating.

1. Write a Blurb First, It Keeps You on Track

Your first step is to write a blurb (a short, enticing description) of your book. Keep it under 75 words. Visit the bookstore or library to read the blurbs of books which are similar to yours. You’ll find the blurb on the back cover of a book.

2. Write Down Everything You Know About Your Topic

Your next step is to write down everything you know about your book’s topic. If you’re writing a novel, write down the story.

Write as quickly as you can, without taking your fingers from the keyboard.

This may take you many hours. Keep going. This engages both your conscious and subconscious mind in the project, so that your subconscious mind keeps “working” on the book for you.

3. Have Fun! Get Engaged and Excited

Are you having fun? If you’re not, your lack of enthusiasm will come through in your words. Get in touch with your original enthusiasm for the book, and remember why you want to write a book. See your book on bookstore shelves.

4. Blog Your Book — Build a Readership (Platform)

Every writer needs to market his book. A publisher will not do it for you — you’re responsible for sales of your book. In fact, the publisher will want to know what your plans are for marketing the book before you’re offered a contract.

The easiest way to market your book is a blog, so create a blog as soon as possible.

5. Get a Mentor

Your final step is to get a mentor for your book. Writing and publishing a book is a long process. You need instruction, guidance and inspiration from someone who’s done it, and who can guide you through it.

So there you have it — five steps to help you to write your book without writer’s block.

Recession-proof your freelance writing career

“Write More And Make More Money From Your Writing: Develop A Fast, Fun Productive Writing Process” gives you all the tools you need for a thriving writing career, no matter what the economic climate.

Three weeks after completing the class one student wrote:

“Thanks Angela, for all your help and advice in class. I’m quitting my job next week. I printed out my letter of resignation tonight after landing a contract writing job that will pay me more for three months part-time work than I earned in from my day job in the whole of 2007! You were right – the great gigs are out there, and now I’ve got the skills to land them. Your class opened my eyes. Bless you…”

“Write More And Make More Money From Your Writing: Develop A Fast, Fun Productive Writing Process” shows you how to thrive as a freelance writer. Would you like to write five times more than you’re writing now, and sell to higher-paying markets? Take the class.