Tag Archives: Kindle

Writing Fiction: 3 Easy Tips For Subplots

Writing Fiction: 3 Easy Tips For Subplots

One of the most fun things in writing fiction is creating subplots.

Unfortunately when creating subplots it’s easy to (literally) lose the main thread of the plot. When this happens, readers stop reading. Let’s look at some tips to help.

When you’re writing fiction, your primary aim is to keep readers entertained, and reading

Firstly, let’s be realistic. Subplots require words. If you need those words for your primary plot and character development, keep your subplots short. Also consider that if you’re writing a short story or novella, you almost certainly won’t have space for a subplot.

From Plot Your Novel: 3 Tips for Sizzling Subplots:

Subplots are easy. All you need to remember is that a subplot isn’t just an unconnected story dumped into your book to bulk it up; it’s a way of adding richness to your story. A subplot always relates directly to your main story in some way.

Let’s look at how subplots can help when you’re writing fiction.

1. Subplots increase the tension and keep readers reading

No matter the genre, you need to keep readers entertained because they have many options for entertainment today. So your primary reason for developing a subplot is to increase tension. You want readers turning the pages wondering what will happen next.

You can manage subplots any way you choose, but I like to hint at the subplot in the Setup phase of a novel (the first 25%), then develop it, and have it alternate with the primary plot.

When you do this, you can hit an OMG! moment in your primary plot, and switch to your subplot for a couple of scenes to increase tension.

2. Use subplots for a change of pace: to add humor, or romance

You may love chocolate cake, but you don’t want to make an entire meal of it.

So, whatever your genre and main plot, a subplot can add a needed change of pace. Shakespeare often added humorous scenes to his tragedies. When there’s too much gloom and doom, you need a contrast so that readers appreciate the next horror scene.

Whatever your genre, humor is always welcome. Try creating a character or two for comic relief.

Consider adding a romantic subplot, if you’re writing in a genre (science fiction, thrillers, mysteries) which doesn’t need romance. In these genres, a romantic subplot not only aids character development, it also provides a useful change of pace.

3. Develop your characters: think opposites

Have you seen the movie The Odd Couple? It’s a gem because it’s the perfect illustration of a strategy you can use when you’re writing fiction to make your characters memorable.

Let’s say you’re writing a mystery. Your subplot could involve your sleuth’s hapless sidekick, as he tries to do something or other. The sidekick is the opposite of your sleuth — think Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson.

You may be writing a romance. A secondary character could be the polar opposite of your heroine or hero. Think Scarlett and Melanie in Gone With The Wind, and Jane and Lydia in Pride & Prejudice.

Not only does creating opposites help with your character development, the contrast between characters provides a change of pace.

Subplots make writing fiction easier

The change of pace which a subplot provides is often as beneficial to authors as it is to readers.

If you get stuck when you’re writing a novel, explore creating subplots. If a subplot adds nothing, you can remove it later.

Have fun with subplots, and write on. 🙂

Self-Publishing Strategy Made Easy: How To Market Your Books In 15 Minutes A Day

Self-Publishing Strategy Made Easy: How To Market Your Books In 15 Minutes A Day

eBook: $5.99

Do you enjoy writing and publishing your books, but find that marketing them is a challenge? You're not sure what works, so your efforts are muddled, half-hearted, and inconsistent.

What if you could market in just 15 minutes daily?

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Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

eBook: $5.99

Your readers want to enter your novel's world. They want to experience your book -- they want to live your book with your main characters.

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Fiction Writing: The Most Popular Posts In 2017

Fiction Writing: The Most Popular Posts In 2017

I started this blog in 2007 — how time flies, to coin a cliche. Back in 2007, although fiction writing was popular, it took the birth of the Kindle to truly expand authors’ interest.

Authors realized that the gatekeepers were gone. For the first time in history, authors could sell their novels directly to readers.

Why is fiction writing so popular?

By 2012, self-publishing had truly arrived. On the Kindle store, fiction outsells nonfiction by a wide margin, so I expected that the blog’s most popular posts in 2017 would be about writing fiction.

A comforting thought: you don’t have to be a brilliant writer to sell fiction. If you tell a good story, readers will read.

Let’s look at the four most popular posts — check them out, if you haven’t read them.

1. Basic Short Story Template: Keep It Simple!

I wrote the most popular post, Basic Short Story Template: Keep It Simple! in 2014. It’s been updated frequently.

If you haven’t discovered writing short stories as a promotional tool, check out the post, and write some short stories. They’re a super-simple way to guide readers to your novels.

2. Fiction Writing Tips for Beginners: Super-Easy Outlines

Outlines tend to stymie fiction authors, so Fiction Writing Tips for Beginners: Super-Easy Outlines, published at the start of 2017, has been popular.

Words to live by when writing fiction:

Fiction is all about emotion. No emotion? You’ve got nothing. Your idea, no matter how wonderful, will fizzle out.

3. Writing Short Stories: How Many Scenes Do You Need?

Another post from 2014: Writing Short Stories: How Many Scenes Do You Need? has been hugely popular.

One of the first things you think about when you’re writing fiction is — how long is this? Then you (if you’re like me) track your word count obsessively, because you know that your milestones determine the success or otherwise of a piece of fiction.

4. New Novelist: Write A Selling Novel With One Simple Strategy

I’m thrilled that this post, New Novelist: Write A Selling Novel With One Simple Strategy, is so popular.

To write novels which sell, every novel:

… must have a point. All the screaming excitement of your novel can’t and won’t make up for it if there’s no point.

Please use the strategy I outline in that post. The strategy won’t guarantee a bestseller, but you have no hope of selling if your novel doesn’t have a point.

Enjoy the posts. 🙂

Heart To Heart: Romance Writing For Beginners

Heart To Heart: Romance Writing For Beginners

eBook: $5.99
Author:
Series: Romance Writing, Book 1
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

Love makes the world go round, and of all the genres in fiction, romance, with its many sub-genres, is the most popular.

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More Heart To Heart: Write Hot-Selling Romance Fiction

More Heart To Heart: Write Hot-Selling Romance Fiction

eBook: $5.99
Author:
Series: Romance Writing, Book 2
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

I adore writing romance fiction, and now you can write romance too.

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Self-Publishing If You’re A New Fiction Author: 5 Tricks

Self-Publishing If You’re A New Fiction Author: 5 Tricks

Although the halcyon days of the Kindle gold rush are over, self-publishing still provides great rewards, even for a brand new author.

Just a few days ago a jubilant author who’s been writing for less than a year sent me an email message with a screen clip. In the first 18 days of November, her two books (I promised not to mention the genre) earned over a thousand dollars. At the rate her sales and KENPC are going, I can see her doubling that thousand within a few weeks.

Until November, her books were selling just a few copies a month. Then they took off.

Self-publishing is STILL a goldmine, if…

Why did her books suddenly take off? She’s been doing all the usual things like building a list, and spending a little money on Facebook ads. Mostly, the gods alone know, but two things she did are clever.

Here they are:

  • She’s writing in a very popular genre, and is following genre tropes which readers love;
  • She’s writing a series.

So let’s look at some self-publishing tricks especially for new authors. Established authors can learn from them too.

One thing I should mention… if you’re a new author: be patient. Overnight successes can take quite a few nights until they happen.

1. Write in a popular genre: the more readers, the more potential sales

Pay attention to your genre. Popular genres like romance, with all its sub-genres, have masses of readers who love to read, and are hungry for new books and authors.

What if your favored genre has few readers?

That’s OK. As long as you believe in yourself (see the fifth tip), and write characters YOU love, keep going. Who knows, you might be an author who drags your genre out of obscurity. 🙂

2. Write in a series: each book sells the others

Yep. Write in a series, as soon as you can.

If you can’t — you’re not sure how to turn a book into a series, or your mind doesn’t click and go hey, this world could support a series… Write short stories.

I love writing short stories for the marketing benefits, and also because I can play with many different worlds and characters. Most of my novels had their seed in a previous short story.

3. A little marketing really does help: it can be minimal

Whenever I mention “marketing” new authors have lots of objections. They don’t know how, they don’t want to blog, etc.

As I’ve always said, a little marketing can go a long way. You needn’t spend hours on it. A few minutes a day is fine.

4. Use your back matter to promote your books: add an excerpt

Use the back matter of your books to promote other books.

I’m always amazed when I mention this to authors (established authors, as well as newbies) and discover that they aren’t doing it, because it’s so simple.

When you’ve written the second book in a series, edit Book 1 to include the first scene or two of Book 2 in the back matter. Also at the end of Book 2, mention “Book 3 coming soon” and add a link to your website or Facebook page.

When Book 3 comes out, edit Book 2, to provide an except of Book 3 in the back matter. And so on and so forth.

It takes just 20 minutes to edit a book, and republish it.

5. Believe in yourself: write in a genre which is fun for you

Which genres of fiction do you read for fun? If you’re not reading a genre with pleasure, you’re unlikely to be able to write successfully in that genre. Your reading tells you what readers of the genre want.

When your writing is FUN for you, it’s likely to be fun for readers, as well. Please don’t torture yourself, trying to write in a genre which bores you, or which you actively dislike. It won’t work.

(Bonus tip) Avoid freebies and 99 cent ebooks

“Free” isn’t a guarantee of anything, least of all readers. Today, readers have so many freebies offered to them that they no longer trust “free.” They tend to look on 99 cent ebooks as trash too.

If you’re uncertain about pricing, price at the upper levels of the indie authors in your genre.

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

eBook: $5.99

You can, when you discover the secrets of writing blurbs (book descriptions) which sell.

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Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99

I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly.

More info →
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Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.