Tag Archives: self-publishing

Self-Publishing Professional: How To Sell Your Services

Self-Publishing Professional: How To Sell Your Services

Learning self-publishing is a challenge, but once you’ve learned how to publish your own books, you have an excellent skill which can earn income for you. New self-publishers, and even experienced ones, welcome help in many different areas of the self-publishing process.

Self-publishing pro: how do you get started?

A year ago, one of my writing students quit her day job, and then promptly became blocked. She decided that she had to go back to work. While she was job hunting, I suggested that she post on a self-publishers’ forum that she was ready to help others to publish their books. She managed to get some editing work right away.

Within a month, she had so much editing work that she had to stop advertising. When I last heard from her, she was back to full-time self-publishing, and doing a little editing on the side.

You can try a similar strategy to get your first clients; no need for a website unless you already have one. Investigate the various Facebook forums for self-publishers, as well as other online forums. However — this is important — do make a few posts to establish who you are first, so that people get to know you. Then by all means ask whether anyone needs help with self-publishing.

Now let’s look at some publishing areas in which you might consider offering services.

Self-publishing areas in which you can offer help

  • Research services. Bestselling authors have always hired researchers, now self-publishing authors need help too.
  • Covers. Not necessarily designing covers (but if you have the skills, go for it), consider offering help sourcing images, buying premade images, and commissioning designers.
  • Editing: always a challenge for self-publishing authors. There are several different kinds of edits. Choose the one in which you feel most confident — whether that’s developmental editing or copyediting.
  • Proofreading: always necessary.
  • Formatting for print, and for ebooks. Many authors get hung up over this. They’ll love it if you can offer files which are ready to upload to Amazon KDP, Amazon Createspace, and elsewhere.
  • Marketing help. This is a challenge for authors, always. You can offer basic help, as well as more extensive help. Basic help would include things like setting up a Facebook page and mailing list. More extensive help could include setting up Amazon ads, Facebook ads, etc.

Getting paid for self-publishing help

All creatives (writers, designers, photographers) are paid up-front. Obviously, this makes a lot of sense. You have a micro business, so you can’t afford to chase people who owe you money.

When you’re starting out, you can generate PayPal invoices so that people who want your help can pay you.

As your business builds, ecommerce solutions like Shopify make it simple for you to get paid for your self-publishing services, as well as to keep records for tax. Selz is a another option — it’s also simple and easy to use.

Selling services is a little different from selling goods, and Selz advises you:

To build your service business on Selz, you must be able to prove you have provided the service. This can be very easy. You could collect an email receipt from each of your buyers as proof. If you are delivering the service in person, you could collect a physically signed receipt.

With hundreds of thousands of authors who self-publish, your self-publishing services will be welcomed by your clients.

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Nonfiction Ebooks Goldmine: Write and Sell Nonfiction Ebooks In 24 Hours Or Less

Nonfiction Ebooks Goldmine: Write and Sell Nonfiction Ebooks In 24 Hours Or Less

$5.99
Author:
Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 5
Genre: Writing
You're a writer. You need to make money from your words. What if you could create AND sell a nonfiction book in just a day? More info →
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Bestselling Fiction: 5 Tips To Turn A Wonderful Mess Into A Novel

Bestselling Fiction: 5 Tips To Turn A Wonderful Mess Into A Novel

You’ve completed your novel. It’s so horrible that you’re ashamed. What on earth gave you the idea that you could write a novel, much less write bestselling fiction? Calm down. If you’ve got a mess, that’s AMAZING. It’s exactly what you’re supposed to have at the first draft stage.

Seriously. Never, ever worry about your first draft. You’ve got a NOVEL — even in potential, and that’s a huge achievement. Celebrate that.

(Please be aware that your novel may still be at the first draft stage, even if you’ve written several drafts… Many new authors fiddle with sentence structure and word choice, and imagine that they’re writing a draft. You’re not. You’re copyediting.)

All bestselling fiction goes through a chaotic stage

Let’s look at what a “draft” is. Creating a second draft/ rewriting isn’t recreating your novel from the beginning. (That said, it can be, if you feel that you’ve missed the mark completely and want a do-over.) If anything, rewriting is more akin to putting together a jigsaw puzzle, while creating some new pieces to fit.

Let’s look at some tips to help.

1. What are you writing? What’s the genre and story question?

Before you do anything else, reread what you’ve written.

Makes notes on the emotional highpoints — what makes you feel? Fiction is all about emotion, so you need to know what works, and what doesn’t, at this stage.

Then decide on your genre, if you haven’t done it already. Also, check to see whether you have a story question — this is the one essential which turns a mess into a potential bestselling novel.

2. Rewrite your major scenes: these are the BIG scenes in your novel

If you’re not sure about scenes, this article will help, Write Hot Scenes For Bestselling Fiction: 5 Magical Tips:

Scenes are the building blocks of your fiction

In the 21st century, every reader understands drama.

TV and movie stories are delivered in scenes. If you want lots of readers, you need to learn to deliver your stories in scenes too.

Readers are impatient. They just want the story. Deliver. Show, rather than tell. “Showing” means writing in scenes.

You’ll have two or three major scenes. Rewrite these, without focusing on what you’ve written. You know your story, your aim now is to deliver emotion in all your scenes, but most especially in the big scenes of your novel.

3. Check for holes in your plot: create new scenes

All plots have holes. You can ask someone else to find them for you, but try to do it yourself. Read through your novel again, and check the characters’ behavior and thoughts. Do they make sense, logically? If any character’s behavior doesn’t make sense, that’s fine — you’ll need to foreshadow the weird behavior.

While you’re checking, write new scenes where you need them.

4. Characters: introducing a character, and showing character changes

Next, focus on your characters. Check how you introduce your main characters. Your main characters will change in your novel, as they grow from their experiences. Make sure you’re showing the changes.

5. Check (or create) your timeline

Timelines can be tricky. You can have someone’s mother marrying at five years old, and a character in London when he’s supposed to be on a ship somewhere in the Pacific.

And your draft is done… now comes editing. 🙂

Want to write a bestseller? Check out: How To Write In Scenes… The Magical Secret To Writing Well And Selling More

Fiction: How To Write In Scenes
Fiction: How To Write In Scenes

Want to write wonderful stories readers love… fiction which SELLS? Our new program guides you in developing an amazing (and fun) fiction writing career: you’ll write better novels faster. You’ll also win fans who love your novels and are eager to buy them.

Read more.

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out our ebooks for writers.

Short Fiction Secrets: How To Write And Sell Short Stories

Short Fiction Secrets: How To Write And Sell Short Stories

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Want to write short stories? If you answered yes, that's excellent… Here's why. Today, you can make money writing short fiction. More info →
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Secrets Of Bestselling Fiction (New Program)

Secrets Of Bestselling Fiction (New Program)

You’re an author of fiction; new or aspiring. One of your biggest challenges is keeping your readers entertained. Does your reader read your entire novel? If he doesn’t, your payments for Pages Read in Kindle Unlimited will suffer — as will any chance you have of that reader buying your next novel.

Let’s look at how you win fans: readers who eagerly read every word of your novels, and just as eagerly wait for your next novel. I’ll auto-buy anything new from John Sandford, John Grisham, and Nora Roberts. Someone once said that if you have 100 true fans, you have a business.

Readers become fans because they know that their favorite authors entertain them. It’s a huge relief to be able to buy a novel and be sure that you’re buying several hours of great entertainment. So, how do you write books which entertain?

To write a bestseller, you must entertain

Today, bestselling fiction is written in scenes. In the Victorian era, authors could get away with writing meandering 800-page narratives because few books were published. That said, classic novelists, who are read as eagerly today as they were 200 years ago, like Jane Austen, write in scenes.

When coaching my students, I’ve found that the easiest way to ensure than an author writes entertaining novels and short stories is to encourage him to write in scenes.

So, what’s a scene?

From Fiction: How To Write In Scenes:

What’s a scene? Become a scene expert

You may have heard someone say that your fiction is all telling, rather than showing. Scenes are “showing”. (Narrative is “telling”, and we’ll get to that in a moment.)

I’m fond of saying that a scene is “a unit of action.” Yes, I know… that’s probably as clear as mud. 🙂

A scene happens in real time. The reader inhabits your Point of View (POV) character; the reader is seeing what the POV character sees, touching what he touches, and feeling what he feels.

Writing in scenes makes writing your fiction easier

Writing a novel? Write 40 to 60 scenes, and you’re done. Knowing how many scenes you’ll write, makes outlining (if you’re an author who outlines) much easier. On the other hand, if you’d rather eat worms than outline, writing in scenes ensures that you know which “BIG” scenes you need to write — and that may well be all you need to know.

Check out our new program, “Fiction: How To Write In Scenes… The Magical Secret To Writing Well And Selling More”

Fiction: How To Write In Scenes
Fiction: How To Write In Scenes

Want to write wonderful stories readers love… fiction which SELLS? Our new program guides you in developing an amazing (and fun) fiction writing career: you’ll write better novels faster. You’ll also win fans who love your novels and are eager to buy them.

Read more

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out our ebooks for writers.

Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

$4.99
Author:
Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 4
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction
You want to write a novel. Perhaps you can't get started. Or maybe you got started, and then you stopped.You need a plan, broken down into easy steps. This program began as a 30-day challenge which I organized for readers in 2010. Hundreds of writers joined the challenge and completed it. They wrote novels. More info →