Tag Archives: sell your book

Write Your Novel: Your Characters’ Thoughts Sell Your Book

Write Your Novel

Every morning I get out of bed, pour a cup of coffee, and stumble into my office. I’m not awake. I never am until I’ve got some caffeine in my veins. That’s fine, because it’s precisely the right state in which to write fiction.

For the next half hour, I enter the imaginary world of my novel.

That borderline state between alertness and the dream world is perfect for writing from the heart. Your words come directly from your subconscious mind.

Over the years, I’ve learned not to place any demands on myself in this dreamy creative state. I just start writing, accepting whatever comes, whether it’s part of what I’m working on, or not.

This morning, what came was a new character. She’s funny, charming, and combative. She’s at a wedding, and almost gets into a fight with the bride.

I love her. She has no place in any novel on which I’m working, but that’s also fine. She’s a gift. Be alert to the gifts your heart and subconscious mind give you.

There’s another reason I like writing in a dreamy state: emotion. It’s easier to think and feel as your characters do when you’re in this state. When you share your characters’ thoughts, you engender corresponding emotions in the reader.

Here’s why this is important: your reader wants to experience your book, so emotions SELL.

Thoughts equal emotion: what’s your character thinking?

The erotic novel Fifty Shades Of Grey made its author, E.L. James, into a multi-millionaire in just a few months.

Although I haven’t read the trilogy, judging from excerpts I’ve read, and the reviews, I have a good idea of what’s making the books sell: emotion.

Unlike nonfiction, fiction is all about emotion. Give readers an emotional experience, and your books will sell.

So… how do we arouse emotion, firstly in ourselves, then in readers?

The answer is: your characters’ thoughts.

The more you reveal characters’ thoughts and use deep point of view, the more your readers live your characters’ lives. They share your characters’ emotions.

Pitfall: don’t tell us how your characters feel

Don’t tell us:

  • Emily was scared;
  • Henry was happy;
  • Sandra’s heart was broken… etc.

We’re not going to take your word for it.

SHOW us Emily’s thoughts, as she faces the mugger. She’s married and pregnant. What thoughts go through her mind? She thinks that she’ll never hold her baby. That argument she had with her spouse – she wishes she could take those hurtful words back now. If she dies, she doesn’t want those words to color his last memories of her.

When you show us what a character’s thinking, we forget that we’re reading: we experience your book.

How does your favorite author engender emotion in YOU?

Today, skim through three books in your current novel’s genre. Look for characters’ thoughts. Read carefully, so that you can see the connection between thoughts, and emotion.

Make notes. What tricks do the authors use, to build emotion in readers?

EMOTION – and the ability to arouse it – is central to writing fiction. Understand that, and learn how to do it, and you’ll write books which sell.
, and on Twitter: @angee

 

New Author: Five Easy Ways to Promote Your Book

Write a Book

You’re new author; you’ve written a book. You know that in order to sell your book, you’ll need to promote it. Let’s look at some easy ways for you to do that.

1. Create a Blog and Blog Consistently

To become known as an author, and to sell your book as well as all the books you’ll write in the future, you need to create a platform. The easiest way to begin creating a platform is to create a blog.

It’s easy to create a free blog. You can do it in minutes. Your blog is powerful, as long as you blog consistently. You’ll build your readership one reader at a time. Your blog gives your readers the opportunity to get to know you and your writing. If they enjoy your blog, your readers will not only buy your books, they’ll help you to promote them.

2. Offer the First Chapter Free

Amazon does this because it works. If you’re publishing your book on the Kindle book store or on Amazon, Amazon will offer a free chapter of your book. If you’ve written a very short book, the freebie will be around 10% of your book.

Whether or not your readers find your book on Amazon depends on how clever you are with metadata. The metadata is your book’s title, its category, its tags and its description. Creating the right metadata is vital. Look on it as advertising for your book.

You should also make a free chapter available on your blog.

Please don’t forget to link to your book’s page on Amazon so that readers can buy; many writers omit this simple step. (Then they say that blogging “doesn’t work” to promote books.)

3. Become a Guest on Others’ Blogs

Writing a guest article for another author’s blog is an easy way to tap into that blog’s readership.

You can also interview authors on your blog; in return they may interview you.

4. Buy Inexpensive Advertising

Advertising works. It’s very easy to buy small ads on various blogs. Some of the larger, and more highly trafficked sites will of course charge you more than smaller sites.

However, don’t discount even small sites. Because of the way the web works, all links to your site a valuable. Therefore if you buy an inexpensive advertisement on a small site, you can count on additional search engine traffic, as well as traffic from the site on which you’re advertising.

5. Make the Most of the Tools Amazon Gives You

We’ve already talked about metadata. Even huge publishing companies don’t use the metadata on Amazon as effectively as they could. Beyond metadata, Amazon has other tools for you to use.

Your primary tool is your Amazon author page. Make sure that all your books are listed on your author page, and that you write an effective bio.

You should also add your RSS feed to your author page. Once your RSS feed has been added, each time you post an article on your blog, the article will also appear on your Amazon author page.

The more visible you are online, the more your readership will grow. Remember that you’re not just promoting and selling one book; you’re building your platform as an author.