Tag Archives: writing process

3 Tips To Writing Page-Turning Fiction, Starting Today

3 Tips To Writing Page-Turning Fiction, Starting Today

Want to write page-turning fiction?

Start by writing in scenes.

Then focus on the emotions.

Fiction is all about emotion

From Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic:

Fiction is all about emotion, and that emotion has reasons, which derive from action. You’ll often see novels which critics hate on top of various bestseller lists. Remember the fuss about the Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy? Critics hated the books. However, those books sold in their millions. Why? Simple. Emotion. The books gave readers an emotional experience: they entertained readers, so the novels sold — and sold some more.

They’ll go on selling, because readers will always want entertainment.

Let’s look at some tips to help you to write fiction that readers love.

1. Focus on emotion while you write

We talked about outlining for emotion here:

Consider the emotions you want your reader to feel. Keep reminding yourself of the emotions as you write – this will soon become automatic. I’ve found that if I’m getting bored as I write, it’s always because I’ve lost the emotional thread. Throw in more conflict. Make your characters fight for what they want.

2. Find the feeling in each scene

It’s vital that you write in scenes, so that you can focus on the emotions, because readers are reading for emotion. When you focus on each scene, you can ask yourself:

  • Who wants what, here, in this scene?
  • What are they feeling?
  • Why?
  • What changes in the scene?

3. Think about what your characters want, before writing a scene

From Fiction Writing Basics: Focus On EMOTION:

Your characters have GOALS. If they don’t have goals, you don’t have a story. They also need to be motivated to achieve their goals: no motivation, no story. And of course, your characters don’t get an easy ride. Their goals are hard to achieve.

This means that your novels and short stories need to be about something important — important, that is, to the characters — important enough to raise strong emotions.

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

Want to write better fiction? Know yourself emotionally

Writing fiction can be difficult, because (if you’re writing good fiction) you’re dealing with emotions, day after day. It’s wearing.

You may find yourself avoiding scenes which you know you need to write, because you don’t want to feel those emotions. That’s OK. Over time, you’ll become accustomed to manipulating readers’ emotions, and will understand your own emotions on a deeper level.

So you could say that writing fiction is therapeutic, and good for you. Remember to have fun with it. 🙂

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

eBook: $5.99

Your readers want to enter your novel's world. They want to experience your book -- they want to live your book with your main characters.

More info →
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Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

$4.99
Author:
Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 4
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

You want to write a novel. Perhaps you can't get started. Or maybe you got started, and then you stopped.You need a plan, broken down into easy steps. This program began as a 30-day challenge which I organized for readers in 2010. Hundreds of writers joined the challenge and completed it. They wrote novels.

More info →

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.

3 Steps To Write A Book With The “8 Hours” Strategy

3 Steps To Write A Book With The “8 Hours” Strategy

Looking for a side hustle? Self-publishing is hot, so perhaps you’ve decided to write a book. Sadly, books can take months and years to write.

What if you could write a book within hours?

Can you write a book in eight hours?

We’ve just released a brand new training program to help you to write your book within hours: 8 Hour Ebooks Video Training.

Once you learn the process, you can use it to create anything you like.

To give you an overview, let’s look at the steps you take.

1. Decide on your audience: what do they need?

Before you do anything else, even before you go idea hunting, it’s vital to consider your audience, and what your audience needs.

A tip. To make creation easier, and cut down on the research needed, the audience you choose should be much like you. Although it’s possible to relate to almost anyone, getting familiar with an audience you don’t know takes time. In eight hours, most of your effort goes into creation, rather than research.

Once you’ve chosen your audience, think about what your audience wants and needs. If you’re writing nonfiction, what challenges do they have?

On the other hand, perhaps you’re writing fiction — a short story, novella, or a serial — in your eight hours. With fiction, you consider your audience too. You want to entertain them, so think about what movies and TV your audience watches. What books do they read?

2. Develop the framework for your project, and write

A “framework” is an outline, but it’s much more, too. With the right framework for your book, you’ll zoom through your project quickly.

As well as helping you to develop a framework for your project, 8 Hour Ebooks Video Training helps you to write fast and well.

3. Create your cover image — and SELL

You can hire a designer, or buy a premade cover design, if you like. However, 8 Hour Ebooks Video Training shows you how to create a pro-quality book cover in minutes, for free.

While hiring a designer is wonderful, the hiring comes with costs, not only in money, but also in time. When you know how to design a good cover quickly, you save on both money and time.

Get started on your 8 Hour project today

8 Hour Ebooks Video Training covers everything you need. And as a bonus, personal coaching is included too. I look forward to writing with you. 🙂

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

Blurbs Sell Your Books: Craft Irresistible Blurbs, And Sell More Fiction And Nonfiction Today

eBook: $5.99

You can, when you discover the secrets of writing blurbs (book descriptions) which sell.

More info →
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Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99

I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly.

More info →
Buy from Apple iBooks
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Inktera
Buy from Amazon Kindle

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.

3 Quick NaNoWriMo Writing Tips To Boost Your Inspiration

3 Quick NaNoWriMo Writing Tips To Boost Your Inspiration

Are you doing NaNoWriMo this year? If you are, you’re around a week into your novel, and your inspiration is flagging.

Professional novelists know that after a week or two of writing, or at around 10,000 words, they’ll hit “the wall.”

The wall is the point at which you think you’re writing the wrong novel.

You CAN complete a NaNoWriMo (or any novel) when your inspiration flags

Amazingly, the wall can seem like fresh inspiration.

A charmingly seductive voice whispers: your novel is boring. You made a mistake. Here’s a MUCH better idea… It’s a guaranteed bestseller. Drop the dreck, and write THIS NOW…

Dismiss the voice, please.

ALL novels hit the wall sooner or later. A “better idea” isn’t. You’ll hit the wall with that idea too.

Here are some tips to give your inspiration a swift kick up the derriere, so that you can complete your novel (whether it’s NaNoWriMo or not) in style.

1. Power through by outlining fresh scenes (even if you don’t know where they’ll fit)

Although the voice intends to derail you, it sometimes has a point about the “better idea.”

Thank the voice, and make a note of the idea it brought you. Tell it that you’ll work on its “idea” next, after you complete this novel.

Now, ask the voice, because it’s the part of your creative self which specializes in ideas, for fresh ideas for wonderful scenes for this novel. Tell the voice that the scenes can be for the setup, the middle portion, or the final quarter of your novel. You don’t care.

Ideas for new scenes will come to you.

Add the ideas where they fit. If you’re not sure, put the ideas into a “unplaced scenes” folder. Scrivener, if you’re using the app, makes creating folders easy.

2. Create differently: dictate, handwrite, or sketch-write to generate words

You can often break through the wall by changing the way you write.

You can:

  • Write in a coffee shop, or write on your phone;
  • Dictate the next few scenes;
  • Write several scenes by hand; or
  • “Sketch-write” the scenes.

When you “sketch write” you write your scenes in all dialogue, or jot notes for them. Tell yourself you’re just playing around, you’re not really writing anything at all.

Oddly enough, when you tell yourself that you’re not writing, you’re playing, your resistance dissolves. It’s a trick, and it works.

3. Rethink: what do you REALLY want to write? (A subplot may help)

The wall gifts you with clarity on all the holes in your plot, as well as insights into problems with your characters.

Don’t panic. Although the voice can be brutal, it’s helpful too, as long as you don’t dissolve into a puddle of tears and despair.

Since the voice tends to toss ideas at you, ask for an idea for a subplot.

Subplots are fun to write. They also make your novel richer.

In Writing Fiction: 3 Easy Tips For Subplots, we suggested some ideas for subplots:

… whatever your genre and main plot, a subplot can add a needed change of pace. Shakespeare often added humorous scenes to his tragedies. When there’s too much gloom and doom, you need a contrast so that readers appreciate the next horror scene.

Whatever your genre, humor is always welcome. Try creating a character or two for comic relief.

Consider adding a romantic subplot, if you’re writing in a genre (science fiction, thrillers, mysteries) which doesn’t need romance. In these genres, a romantic subplot not only aids character development, it also provides a useful change of pace.

NaNoWriMo: onward, ever onward. Keep writing

If you refuse to stop writing when you hit the wall, you’ll discover that you’ll tap into fresh inspiration and will power through your novel.

Use the above tips to regain your enthusiasm.

Have fun. 🙂

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

eBook: $5.99

Your readers want to enter your novel's world. They want to experience your book -- they want to live your book with your main characters.

More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Apple iBooks
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

$4.99
Author:
Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 4
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

You want to write a novel. Perhaps you can't get started. Or maybe you got started, and then you stopped.You need a plan, broken down into easy steps. This program began as a 30-day challenge which I organized for readers in 2010. Hundreds of writers joined the challenge and completed it. They wrote novels.

More info →

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.