Plot Your Novel the Easy Way With Trello

I love using Trello for fiction writing

Have you discovered Trello? Trello is free, and you can use it to plan anything. It’s especially useful for plotting your novel.

I use Scrivener for writing books; it has a handy index card view which you can use while you’re in the process of writing. However, for the initial brainstorming and plotting, I prefer to use Trello. Preferably at the library or in a coffee shop, where I’m more relaxed. (Trello is available for iOS and Android mobile devices, so you can plot anywhere.)

Basically, Trello is a notice board. If you’re a fan of using index cards to plot your novel, You already know how to use Trello. You create boards, then lists on your boards, and pin cards to your lists.

Plotting your novel with Trello, and its magical index cards

Plot Your Novel the Easy Way With Trello

Blogger Chewy Chunks uses Trello for scenes as I do:

Trello is a free project managing tool that I recommend as a means of storing and sorting all your book scenes. You can write each idea on a card, just like physical cards, and move them around under different headings in order to outline the plot.

I create a list on my novel’s board for each point in the 7 Point plotting system, then brainstorm scenes for that point. When you do this, your novel will grow quickly.

Primary characters each get their own list. Secondary characters, locations, and arcs, each get a card. You can copy cards, lists and boards, so you can move stuff around freely. To get rid of an item, just archive it.

Tip: if you want to attach a character or other image to a card, just drag the card onto the image.

Another tip: if you use Evernote, you can copy note links to Trello cards. When I’m in the early stages of a novel, I often find myself thinking about the characters, and writing notes in Evernote. Then I copy the note’s link across to the relevant cards in Trello.

Use Trello in any way which makes sense to you

Create as many boards as you like in Trello – there’s no limit to the number of boards, or lists or cards.

You can easily drag or move items anywhere you want them to go.

When you first start using Trello for your novel, just create boards and cards as you think of them. You’ll organize later, as your plot takes shape.

Can’t wait to start writing? If you can’t wait to work on a scene, just create a file on your computer, in Google Drive, or Dropbox. Attach it to a card by dragging the file onto a card, or choose Attach File when you’re working on the card.

Trello is wonderful for taking the headaches out of plotting your novel – you’ll be amazed at how creative it makes you.

Updated: February 4, 2018

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Angela Booth is a top copywriter, multi-published author, and writing teacher. She offers many guides, courses and classes to help writers to enhance their skills on her websites. She also provides inspiration and motivation for writers on her writing blogs. Angela has been writing successfully since the late 1970s, and was online in the 1980s, long before the birth of the Web. Her business books have been widely published.