Tag Archives: ebook publishing

Book Marketing: 3 Tips To Boost Sales Of Your Backlist

Book Marketing: 3 Tips To Boost Sales Of Your Backlist

Authors’ book marketing discussions on blogs and forums tend to focus on launching and promoting new titles. What about your older titles?

“Old” books published a year or more ago get short shrift from authors. However, those older titles — your backlist — can be a virtual goldmine. They’re assets.

Book marketing: all your titles are assets you own

Every book you write and publish is an asset, just like your house and car. Recently I asked a group of my students about promoting their backlist.

Only one student out of the entire group had a strategy for backlist promotion. Most students focused entirely on promoting new and upcoming titles with strategies like extensive advertising and pre-orders.

The authors ignored their backlist for many reasons, including:

  • Uncertainty. An author might shove books into KDP Select to take advantage of Kindle Unlimited’s Pages Read’s royalties. He’d promote the titles via Facebook and Amazon advertising, but wouldn’t explore options beyond that;
  • Doubts about a book’s value. An author’s writing improves with each book. If a book doesn’t sell brilliantly authors tend to ignore them, thinking that: “my writing’s much better now…” This is a shame.
  • Lack of time. It takes time to revamp older titles and create and manage promotions for them.

Let’s look at some tips for boosting sales of your backlist.

1. Make a list of your backlist’s titles: can you bundle any of them?

I’m a huge fan of bundling older titles — that is, combining two or more titles into a collection. You’ll sell your bundles for slightly less — not too much less — than the titles’ current price.

Used strategically bundles can not only generate an income for self-publishing authors but they’re also a great way to introduce new readers to your writing.

Start by listing your current titles. The more titles you have, the greater your opportunities to create bundles. Promote your newer titles by adding a preview or two to the back matter.

Don’t go overboard with the bonus content. Amazon’s bonus content rules state that a preview should amount to 10% or less of a book’s total content.

2. Write short stories to boost your older titles, and newer titles too

Amazon’s algorithms tend to favor newer titles. So, new books quickly overwhelm and crowd out older titles. Short stories, and short nonfiction ebooks, are a way of climbing back onto Amazon’s NEW! train.

Your focus isn’t so much on book sales as it is on introducing new readers to your writing. Again, add bonus content to the back matter of your short titles, but no more than 10% of the whole.

3. Share promotional opportunities with other authors in your genre

Clubbing together with other authors in your genre or category means that you can take advantage of more book marketing opportunities.

Not only can your group create genre/ category bundles, but you can also share advertising expenses with other authors. An advertising venue which is too expensive for you as a solitary author becomes more viable when you get together with several other authors.

Book marketing opportunities: review your backlist titles at least every three to six months

Things change fast in publishing. When you review your backlist every few months you’ll find fresh opportunities to market your older titles.

NEW, Short Reads: write short stories and nonfiction ebooks and build your profits today

Have you checked out this program? It shows you how to make money from short ebooks.

Amazon has two categories for short ebooks. They are: Kindle Short Reads and Kindle Short Stories. You’ll learn how to make money with these two categories in this eye-opening report.

After you read the report, you may well decide that your income will benefit when you write SHORT ebooks, both fiction and nonfiction. Get started NOW.

Planning And Writing A Hot-Selling Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 7

Planning And Writing A Hot-Selling Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 7

eBook: $4.99

When you write in series, you're giving yourself more chances to sell with every novel you write.

More info →
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Apple Books
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Plan, Write, And Publish Serial Fiction In Four Weeks

Plan, Write, And Publish Serial Fiction In Four Weeks

eBook: $5.99

Why write serial fiction?

Everyone's busy today. A serial is by its nature, faster to write, and publish, than a novel.

It's a quicker read too, and many readers appreciate this. While a reader may hesitate before committing hours to a novel, he can read an episode of your serial in minutes.

If you’re a new author, a serial serves to introduce you to readers. A reader may not be willing to commit to a novel by a new author, but be willing to read an episode of a serial.

More info →
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Amazon Kindle

Resources to build your writing career

Check out Angela’s Writing Classes and Angela’s books for writers.

Self-Publishing: My Book Isn’t Selling, Should I Rewrite It?

Self-Publishing: My Book Isn’t Selling, Should I Rewrite It?

Here’s a commonly asked question. An author’s been self-publishing for a year or three, and his earlier books have stopped selling. He’s too involved in his recent releases to promote the older books effectively. He’s not even sure that it would be worthwhile.

In addition at this stage, the author’s reread his early efforts, and winced. He’s a much better writer now.

What to do?

Self-publishing choices: relaunching your back catalogue

Older books do drop off your radar.

If they’re still selling, you wonder whether they’d sell more, if you gave them a little love. On the other hand, a book that’s stopped selling may do better if you took a fresh look at it, because you’re more experienced now.

Self-publishing involves constant decision making.

Your options if you decide to relaunch a book

You’ve got several options.

  • Relaunch with a new cover and blurb, without touching the contents;
  • Rewrite the book, and then relaunch with a new cover and blurb;
  • Treat the book as a completely new title. Rewrite the book completely. Give it a new title.
    Add a sentence under your copyright info. Some thing like: “Previously published as Freddy And The Big Green Creature From Mars, revised and rewritten, with extra chapters.”

You need to take a little care if you’re self-publishing an already-published book as a new title.

Self-publishing a previously published book as a completely new title

Vital: do you have the copyright?

If the title was published by someone else — a traditional publisher, or an online publisher — have the publisher send you a letter stating that you have all rights back in that title.

Assuming that you have all rights in the title, please don’t forget to add the disclosure statement when you publish your “new” book. While it’s unlikely that readers will remember the first version, one or two might.

Most importantly, check where the first version of the book is selling online. If you’re “wide” with the first version — that is, you’re selling on multiple retailers — it’s not a good idea to choose KDP Select for the new title. Amazon requires an exclusive. Withdraw the older version from the other retailers, just to be safe, before you launch the new retitled, and revised version.

Will your republished book sell?

Revamping older titles isn’t a guarantee of more sales. However, I’ve heard enough stories from authors who have tarted up older books and got them selling that it’s worth considering, if you have a back catalogue in your self-publishing venture.

Of course, keep writing new titles too. 🙂

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

eBook: $5.99

Your readers want to enter your novel's world. They want to experience your book -- they want to live your book with your main characters.

More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Apple Books
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Heart To Heart: Romance Writing For Beginners

Heart To Heart: Romance Writing For Beginners

eBook: $5.99
Author:
Series: Romance Writing, Book 1
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

Love makes the world go round, and of all the genres in fiction, romance, with its many sub-genres, is the most popular.

More info →
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Apple Books
Buy from Amazon Kindle

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.

What’s The Best Software To Write A Book?

What’s The Best Software To Write A Book?

For some reason this question’s been coming up frequently: “what software’s the best to write a book?”

The short answer is: whatever you use for your writing sessions now.

Here’s why. Writing a book is challenging, even for people who’ve been at it for years. Learning new software is stressful.

If you want to write a book, keep to your writing routines

You’ll hit “the wall” as anyone does when they write a book. This book crash usually happens around page 100 or Chapter 3. At this stage, you’re looking for reasons to quit.

The book’s crap and you have many, many excuses for not carrying on. The idea’s lousy, you’re too busy, you’ll write next vacation — and so on and so forth.

You don’t need special software to write a book

I adore Scrivener. I’ve been using it for a decade, ever since the beta version. Much as I love it, for the first couple of years I wrote in MS Word, then dragged the docs into Scrivener. Mostly that was because clients and editors wanted Word docs. But also, it was wanting to get stuff done.

You have a writing routine now, even if you’re a relatively new writer. If you tinker with that routine too much, you’ll procrastinate, or worse, you’ll block. Your productivity will go out the window.

Useful software for writing books

After all these years, Scrivener is part of my book-writing routine. My books and writing courses start and end in Scrivener.

I write shorter material like articles and blog posts in Ulysses. Not only is Ulysses a fun writing tool, it also makes it easy to output docs to HTML, PDF, ePub, and DOCX.

Many authors use the Ulysses app (Mac)
Many authors use the Ulysses app (Mac)

I know several authors who write their books in Google Docs. I couldn’t imagine anything more punishing, but kudos to them.

I’ve also heard good things about:

  • yWriter, which looks Scrivener-like;
  • (free) FocusWriter, a cross-platform app which is minimalist. The bare bones interface is meant to remove distractions;
  • (free) LibreOffice, an MS Office alternative;
  • (free) Sigil, open source, cross-platform, and useful only if you’re a little techy. Outputs ePub documents. Inputs can include HTML, and plain text. Creates elegant ebooks. If you’d like to try it, this is the official website.
Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

eBook: $5.99

Your readers want to enter your novel's world. They want to experience your book -- they want to live your book with your main characters.

More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Apple Books
Buy from Amazon Kindle
The Journaling Habit: Achieve Your Goals And Change Your Life In Just Ten Minutes A Day

The Journaling Habit: Achieve Your Goals And Change Your Life In Just Ten Minutes A Day

eBook: $5.99

Do you love your life?

If you don't ADORE your life, you can change it — more easily than you can imagine.

More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Apple Books
Buy from Amazon Kindle

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.