Tag Archives: inspiration

Find Motivation To Complete Your Novel

Find Motivation To Complete Your Novel

You’re writing your novel. Then you get stuck. Several days go by. Then a week. The more you try to force yourself to write, the more you resist.

Your novel is doomed. Or is it? Let’s look at some tips which will help you to find motivation again. By the way — these tips work for all uncompleted novels — even those novels on which you’ve completely given up.

Here we go…

1. Forget your novel for now: write something else

Try writing something else. Start another novel, or write a short story. Chances are that you’re trying too hard. You’re tripping over your mental feet; your creative self has gone silent.

Beginning a new project coaxes your creativity out of hibernation.

Complete this sentence (write it, don’t just think it): “It would be huge fun to write…”

Start writing. 😉

2. List your written scenes: what’s missing?

Open your novel’s computer file. Even this small step may be challenging if you’re blocked. Tell yourself you’re an investigator. You’re just investigating the project — you don’t need to write, if you don’t want to.

Without thinking about it too much, write one-sentence descriptions of what happens in each scene.

This may be enough to get you starting writing again. When you get stuck, it’s often because you’ve lost the main thread of your story.

3. Let your characters speak (write character journals)

Choose a character. Write 300 words of the character’s journal. Write in first person, from that character’s point of view. If the character’s angry, that’s wonderful. It means that there’s real energy there, and you can work with that.

Keep writing if you’re getting useful information. Or, write another character’s journal.

The journalling process may be enough to get you started writing your novel again.

4. Change the point of view (POV) character of an important scene

Choose a scene. Write the scene from the point of view of another character in the scene. This can get you thinking about your plot in a new way. Perhaps you’re trying to tell the story from the incorrect point of view.

5. Dream about your novel

This works. Tonight, before you go to sleep, grab a notepad. Write: “(novel title) What’s the story really about?”

Tomorrow, you may wake up with some insights.

Whether you do, or you don’t, write 100 words about your novel before you get up.

Thinking too much about your novel in a critical fashion always blocks you. “Dreaming” about your novel encourages your creative self to become involved in the project again.

6. Begin at the end: write the ending scene, then work backward, listing scenes you could write

You don’t need to write your novel in chronological, or any other order. When a project doesn’t flow, writing scenes out of order inspires your creative self.

So, write the final scene of your novel.

Then, working backwards, write a list of scenes.

Next, write any scene you like — you’ll complete your novel easily.

7. When all else fails, chop your novel into a short story (or stories)

If nothing’s working, it’s time for butchery.

Carve a short story out of your novel.

This article on writing a quick short story will help.

When your motivation fails on a novel, there’s always a reason for your resistance. However, the reason’s unimportant. All that counts is that you complete your novel. Do whatever it takes. These tips will help.

Plan, Write, And Publish Serial Fiction In Four Weeks

Plan, Write, And Publish Serial Fiction In Four Weeks

eBook: $5.99

Why write serial fiction?

Everyone's busy today. A serial is by its nature, faster to write, and publish, than a novel.

It's a quicker read too, and many readers appreciate this. While a reader may hesitate before committing hours to a novel, he can read an episode of your serial in minutes.

If you’re a new author, a serial serves to introduce you to readers. A reader may not be willing to commit to a novel by a new author, but be willing to read an episode of a serial.

More info →
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Amazon Kindle
124 Powerful Fiction Writing Tips: Win Readers And Fans, And Increase Your Sales Today

124 Powerful Fiction Writing Tips: Win Readers And Fans, And Increase Your Sales Today

eBook: $5.99

You want to write fiction. Perhaps you're a self-publishing author — or perhaps you're a ghostwriter, and want to offer fiction writing services to clients.

Whatever your needs and dreams, this book, 124 Powerful Fiction Writing Tips: Win Readers And Fans, And Increase Your Sales Today, will help.

More info →

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.

Writing Fiction: Get Inspired With Pinterest and Trello

Writing Fiction: Get Inspired With Pinterest and Trello

Writing fiction, especially if you’re writing more than one short story, or novel, gets complicated. You’ve got notes, outlines, character and plot ideas everywhere, both on paper, and in various digital storage places. When I asked my romance writing class for their biggest challenge they responded: organization.

I’ve been writing in Scrivener for years, and it’s an amazing tool, but I’ve found two easy and free tools especially useful for fiction. Pinterest for inspiration, and Trello to keep my scenes straight. Pinterest has wonderful “secret” boards, which I use to collect characters, plot ideas, and settings. Trello is especially useful because I work on several projects at a time.

Get Inspired With Pinterest

I start my fiction with images. As I said:

… an image has built-in emotion – if you choose the right image. Fiction is all about emotion. No emotion? You’ve got nothing. Your idea, no matter how wonderful, will fizzle out. Or you’ll have a bunch of weird emotions tumbling around, which you can’t get a handle on… and the novel or short story fizzles out.

Pinterest for fiction

Whenever I find an image which arouses an emotion in me, I save it to one of my secret Pinterest boards. I have boards for each projects, as well as general boards for character traits, clothes and settings.

Try creating your own boards. You’ll find that once your boards are populated with pins, they kickstart your inspiration. Not only will you develop great characters, you’ll also come up with wonderful plot twists.

I like to browse a novel or short story’s board before I start writing each day.

The Charm of Trello: From Chaos to Organization.

Like Pinterest, Trello is perfect for visual thinkers. Yes, Scrivener has its cork board mode, which is very useful, and do use it to organize scenes. But for some reason, I find Trello more relaxing. I use it for planning scenes, plot points, and character arcs. I also keep track of my word counts.

If you use Evernote, as I do, to manage clients, blogging, and everything to do with your daily life, you’ll love Trello. You can copy a note link in Evernote, and attach the link to a Trello card. This is useful to keep track of research, and ideas for current or future projects.

If you’re writing fiction, and working on several projects at a time, try using Pinterest and Trello to not only get inspired, but also to keep everything straight. I’ve found that these two tools make me more productive.

, and on Twitter: @angee.

You can find Angela on Pinterest, too.

Plotting Fiction Made Easier: Start With a Trope

Plotting Fiction Made Easier: Start With a Trop

Writing a short story or a novel and HATE plotting? Many writers find creating plots a struggle. You can make it much easier if you start with a trope.

A trope is a type of story. Our Hot, Hotter, Hottest romance writing class is having lots of fun with common romance tropes. They include staples such as: the billionaire, the accidental baby, the marriage of convenience, second chances, good girl/ bad boy, and so on.

There are tropes for every genre. Here are some science fiction tropes.

Use Your Trope as a Seed.

I’ve had lots of questions about “cheating” if you use a trope.

You’re not cheating, readers like tropes, as a post on Dear Author suggested:

 Many readers admitted that the tagline was more enticing than most of the other elements. The tagline for the book revealed it was a marriage of convenience story and you could hear the “oohhs” from the audience on that reveal.

A trope is useful, because it gives you a handle on the kind of story you’re writing – it’s a seed, a way to start thinking.

For example, let’s say you’re a new author. Writing at novel-length takes time, and is nerve-wracking when you’e just starting out. So you’ve made up your mind that you’re writing a series of novellas. Choosing a trope for each story gets you started plotting.

Let’s say you’ve chosen the popular “billionaire” romance trope. Billionaire romance novels sell very well on Amazon. Start playing the “what if” game with your romance trope.

  • What if your billionaire became a billionaire by accident – he inherited his fortune, or he sold an app to Google… You’re writing a romance, so he needs a partner. What if he falls in love with a woman who’s a doctor. She doesn’t like his new status. Or… ?;
  • What if your billionaire loses touch with his roots. He goes to the town he grew up in, and finds he can’t go home again – he’s different, and people look at him differently. Then he meets a woman… Etc.

A trope won’t plot your story for you, but it gives you a way to start thinking about characters and situations. Try it. Find a trope you like in the genre in which you want to write, and play with the trope. You may just discover that plotting fiction is huge fun – and that you’re writing stories that readers love.

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99

I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly.

More info →
Buy from Apple Books
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Plot Hot-Selling Fiction The Easy Way

Plot Hot-Selling Fiction The Easy Way

$5.99
Author:
Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 3
Genre: Writing

How To Write Novels And Short Stories Readers Love: You're about to discover the easiest, fastest, and most fun plotting method ever. You can use it for all your fiction, whether you're writing short stories, novellas or novels. Take control of your fiction now, and publish more, more easily.

More info →
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Apple Books
Buy from Amazon Kindle

Resources to build your writing career

Get daily writing news and tips on the blog’s Facebook page.

Need help with your writing? Visit our online store, or check out Angela’s books for writers.

Updated December 24, 2017