Tag Archives: Make money writing

Write Short Stories: Use Your Imagination To Pay Your Bills

Write Short Stories: Use Your Imagination To Pay Your Bills
Can you write short stories? If you can, you can make money — yes, you can, for the first time in  decades. If you had asked me even five years ago whether you could make money writing short stories, I would have laughed. Amazon’s Kindle changed all that.

Consider this: you can make money JUST by writing short stories — without a day job to subsidize your writing. Moreover, you don’t even need to be a particularly brilliant writer to sell your short stories, you just need to write them.

A short story is by definition short. As I said in this article, Write Kindle Short Stories: 5 Quick Tips | Angela Booth’s Fab Freelance Writing Blog, a short story can have a very simple structure:

“Get to the point, but not too quickly

A common story structure is: setup (introduce your character), introduction of big problem, conflict and obstacles, climax (all is lost), resolution (story ending, ideally coming full circle, and referring to something that happened in the beginning of your story.)”

Even if you don’t want to make a career of writing short fiction for the Kindle, writing short stories can profitable.

Write and sell short stories for fun and profit

* Convert trash into treasure

If you have a couple of novels collecting dust on your hard drive, why not turn them into short stories?

I recently helped Helga, one of my coaching students, to do this. She turned a partially completed novel into five short stories. And then — the irony — she turned one of the stories into a novel. This was huge fun for her. And the results surprised her. 🙂

I’m always telling my students that nothing you write is ever wasted, and this was a perfect example.

* Turn a couple of hours into an ebook

Got an idea? Often, when you’re writing, you get a strong idea, and wish you could write it. Now you can sell short Kindle fiction, go ahead and write. You’ll have another ebook for sale on the Kindle bookstore, which will draw new readers to your full-length novels.

Another student, Jerry, spent a weekend writing an erotic short story. He published it under a pen name. That short story’s outsold everything else he’s written, by a wide margin. Now he’s writing more erotica. If he hadn’t gone with his gut and published the story, he wouldn’t have opened up an entire new arena for his writing.

* Test an idea

When Lena plotted a new series of fantasy novels, she lost confidence. Writing fantasy was a complete departure for her, so she was using a pen name. She worried that no one would be interested in her new series. I suggested that she test the waters by writing three short stories set in the world she was creating.

Lena’s stories are selling. They’re whetting readers’ appetite for her novels. And Lena now has a lot more confidence.

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99

I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly.

More info →
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Yes, You’re Creative: How To Unlock Your Imagination And Build The Writing Career Of Your Dreams

Yes, You’re Creative: How To Unlock Your Imagination And Build The Writing Career Of Your Dreams

eBook: $5.99

In this book we'll aim to increase your creativity to unlock your imagination and build the writing career of your dreams.

More info →
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Apple Books
Buy from Amazon Kindle

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Confused About Publishing? Your Future Is Up To You

Death for Mr Big

The world of publishing is changing. It won’t go backwards. Where does that leave you, the author?

If you’re confused, consider this. It leaves you with POWER. Authors have never had it before. What you do with that power is up to you.

Be aware that change is HARD. Publishers don’t like change, and writers don’t care for it either.

Here’s how to end the confusion:

* Figure out where you are;

* Decide where you’re going.

How to work out where you are

Kris Rusch’s The Stages of An Indie Writer is an excellent read. It may help you discover where you are:

1. Denial (Traditional Publishing Version)

The writer refuses to acknowledge that traditional publishing has changed. She refuses to act any differently than she did five or ten years ago, whenever she came into the business. She trusts her agent implicitly (while acknowledging that there are scam agents out there), believes she wouldn’t have a career without the agent’s support, and never reviews her financial statements (often doesn’t even review contracts). She lets her agent market her work, believing there is no other way.

Once you’ve figured out where you are, let’s look at where you’re headed.

Where’s publishing headed? Mark Coker offers 10 trends

Your challenge is that publishing’s changes are on-going. Mark Coker, of SmashWords, offers you 10 Trends Shaping the Future of Publishing.

Here’s his presentation.

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