Tag Archives: Write a novel

Book Marketing On Twitter: 3 Tips You Can Use Today

Book Marketing On Twitter: 3 Tips You Can Use Today

Confused about Twitter? Think of it as a way of having a conversation… with everyone on the planet. Naturally, this makes Twitter perfect for book marketing.

I adore Twitter. It’s hard to believe that I’ve been tweeting since 2007. I especially love it because you get an instant response when you want HELP. Twitter is comforting for those moments when your power suddenly goes off, or something disastrous happens, such as a bush fire way too close for comfort.

Disasters aside, you can market your books on Twitter, and you should. It’s a great way to let people know about your books.

Angela Booth on Twitter

Book marketing on Twitter: what you need

One tip. Avoid the hard sell. It’s not necessary to tweet BUY MY BOOK (all in caps); that’s just annoying.

As I said here about selling on social media, on the social media networks, your aim is to:

… provide value: entertainment, news, and information which people need. In the process of this, you’ll be able to sell.

Have fun, and be social.

On Twitter, you can mention your latest book on your profile, and in addition, you can pin your “my book’s published” or similar tweets to your profile, so they don’t get lost.

So, what do you need?

You need:

  • Your book, published or unpublished (aim to build an audience before publication day);
  • Images: photos you took of yourself, your workspace, your dog, your kids… And/ or photos — your book’s cover, plus photos you’ve sourced elsewhere. These might be people who look like your hero/ heroine, etc;
  • Talking points. Such as your book in 25 words; (fiction) character descriptions; (fiction) a character’s journal… etc.

How let’s look at some tips.

1. Avoid random tweeting: create a Twitter book marketing campaign

We discuss this in my new program, Social Media Copywriting And Graphics: Get Attention And Sell More.

Creating campaigns is essential, otherwise you’re just spinning your wheels. You need a baseline, a goal, and a time limit on your campaign, as well as the content that you’ll use.

2. Consider Twitter advertising: is it worth it?

The more books you’re promoting, the more Twitter advertising may be worth it to you. If you have just a single book however, hold off on paid advertising until you’ve created several successful Twitter book marketing campaigns.

We discuss advertising Returns on Investment (ROI) in Social Media Copywriting And Graphics: Get Attention And Sell More. At times, you can ostensibly “lose money” on advertising, and still make a profit.

3. Twitter can be your own personal market research tool when you connect with readers

One of the benefits of social media in general is that you can interact and engage with readers. The relationships you build on Twitter will be useful, because:

  • Readers will tell you what they loved/ didn’t love about a book… think of Twitter as an ongoing focus group;
  • People you get to know on Twitter can make wonderful beta readers;
  • You’ll discover genre trends before other authors.

Book marketing on Twitter: will it work for you?

People tend to either love Twitter, or hate it.

If you’re on the fence, and haven’t tried Twitter, create an account, and start following a few authors. Comment on their posts; retweet tweets you find useful. Remember to set up your profile with the information on your latest book.

Most importantly, have fun on Twitter. It’s one social network which can surprise you at times — in a good way. 🙂

Wish that you could make social media work for you?

Our latest program for writers, Social Media Copywriting And Graphics: Get Attention And Sell More, makes selling your books on social media easy.

In 2019, as book marketing becomes ever more competitive, social media offers solutions, especially if you’d like to become a full-time writer — or if you just want to sell more books.

Self-Publishing Strategy Made Easy: How To Market Your Books In 15 Minutes A Day

Self-Publishing Strategy Made Easy: How To Market Your Books In 15 Minutes A Day

eBook: $5.99

Do you enjoy writing and publishing your books, but find that marketing them is a challenge? You're not sure what works, so your efforts are muddled, half-hearted, and inconsistent.

What if you could market in just 15 minutes daily?

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Yes, You’re Creative: How To Unlock Your Imagination And Build The Writing Career Of Your Dreams

Yes, You’re Creative: How To Unlock Your Imagination And Build The Writing Career Of Your Dreams

eBook: $5.99

In this book we'll aim to increase your creativity to unlock your imagination and build the writing career of your dreams.

More info →
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Resources to build your writing career

Check out Angela’s Writing Classes and Angela’s books for writers.

Make Plotting Fiction Easier: 3 Ideas For Settings And Moods

Make Plotting Fiction Easier: 3 Ideas For Settings And Moods

Before I begin intensive plotting for any piece of fiction, I like to brainstorm settings and moods. It makes plotting easier. Just as movies have location scouts, you can scout locations for your scenes too.

New fiction authors tend to use just a couple of settings, so their fiction is less exciting than it could be.

Plotting and place: everything happens somewhere

Unlike a playwright, or a movie director, novelists don’t have to worry about a budget. They can set their scenes anywhere their imagination takes them — on a lonely island in the Pacific, or on Mars.

Aim to develop settings which will indicate a mood, because this will affect your characters, and intensify their emotions.

You could set a scene in which your main characters are out in a small boat in a storm for example. Set the scene on a cruise ship on a sunny day however, with your characters sipping margaritas, and the mood would be very different.

Let’s look at some ideas for plotting with settings and moods.

1. Enhance your plots: brainstorm locations

Having a variety of settings makes plotting easier.

For example, let’s say that you’re writing a contemporary romance, which is set in your home town. Why your home town? Because you know that location well, in every season of the year, so it cuts down on research time.

Your main character is an artist, who owns a gift shop. Without brainstorming, your locations might be: her home, an old Victorian house; her gift shop; a coffee shop.

All fine, of course. But what if your locations included:

  • The courthouse, where your heroine works as a sketch artist during a trial;
  • The local museum, where she’s commissioned to paint a mural;
  • The local spa, where…
  • And so on.

Without thinking about it too much, you can quickly come up with a number of settings which will set a mood, and help you with plotting.

2. Pantser? Develop settings while you’re writing

Although it’s easier to develop settings while you’re plotting, before you start writing, what if you’re a pantser?

In that case, opportunities to vary your settings will present themselves, if you’re looking for them. Keep asking yourself: what if…?

  • What if I set this scene on a deserted beach, rather than in their kitchen?
  • What if the murder happened on a plane, rather than in an office?

3. Better settings: change your scene locations when you’re editing

Let’s say you’ve written the first draft of a novel, and you’re concerned that the settings are generic. You can change them when you’re editing.

You needn’t change every scene. Look for a scene which needs a little extra punch — you’re sure that you could do more with this scene.

Brainstorm locations. You’ll able to revamp the scene, changing the setting and the mood, without too much effort.

Keep a “settings” file: it makes plotting easier

When you become aware that settings and mood can enhance your fiction, you’ll want to develop a “settings” file.

I keep a Settings notebook in Evernote. If I’m out and about somewhere, and think “oooh… fascinating”, I’ll snap a couple of photos. When I get back to my car, I write a few sentences about the location.

At home, I’ll transfer the idea, as well as the photos, to Evernote. Then I brainstorm how I could use the setting. The brainstorming is important, because ideas tend to be as hazy as dreams. Unless you cement your idea, it drifts away like smoke.

Have fun with settings — you’ll find plotting easier.

Yes, You’re Creative: How To Unlock Your Imagination And Build The Writing Career Of Your Dreams

Yes, You’re Creative: How To Unlock Your Imagination And Build The Writing Career Of Your Dreams

eBook: $5.99

In this book we'll aim to increase your creativity to unlock your imagination and build the writing career of your dreams.

More info →
Buy from Scribd
Buy from Kobo
Buy from Barnes and Noble Nook
Buy from Apple Books
Buy from Amazon Kindle
Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

Map It: For Writing Success — Fiction And Nonfiction Outlines Made Easy

eBook: $5.99

I developed the tactics and strategies in this book to help myself. My students have found them essential to producing both fiction and nonfiction almost effortlessly.

More info →
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Resources to build your writing career

Check out Angela’s Writing Classes and Angela’s books for writers.

3 Tips To Writing Page-Turning Fiction, Starting Today

3 Tips To Writing Page-Turning Fiction, Starting Today

Want to write page-turning fiction?

Start by writing in scenes.

Then focus on the emotions.

Fiction is all about emotion

From Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic:

Fiction is all about emotion, and that emotion has reasons, which derive from action. You’ll often see novels which critics hate on top of various bestseller lists. Remember the fuss about the Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy? Critics hated the books. However, those books sold in their millions. Why? Simple. Emotion. The books gave readers an emotional experience: they entertained readers, so the novels sold — and sold some more.

They’ll go on selling, because readers will always want entertainment.

Let’s look at some tips to help you to write fiction that readers love.

1. Focus on emotion while you write

We talked about outlining for emotion here:

Consider the emotions you want your reader to feel. Keep reminding yourself of the emotions as you write – this will soon become automatic. I’ve found that if I’m getting bored as I write, it’s always because I’ve lost the emotional thread. Throw in more conflict. Make your characters fight for what they want.

2. Find the feeling in each scene

It’s vital that you write in scenes, so that you can focus on the emotions, because readers are reading for emotion. When you focus on each scene, you can ask yourself:

  • Who wants what, here, in this scene?
  • What are they feeling?
  • Why?
  • What changes in the scene?

3. Think about what your characters want, before writing a scene

From Fiction Writing Basics: Focus On EMOTION:

Your characters have GOALS. If they don’t have goals, you don’t have a story. They also need to be motivated to achieve their goals: no motivation, no story. And of course, your characters don’t get an easy ride. Their goals are hard to achieve.

This means that your novels and short stories need to be about something important — important, that is, to the characters — important enough to raise strong emotions.

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

Want to write better fiction? Know yourself emotionally

Writing fiction can be difficult, because (if you’re writing good fiction) you’re dealing with emotions, day after day. It’s wearing.

You may find yourself avoiding scenes which you know you need to write, because you don’t want to feel those emotions. That’s OK. Over time, you’ll become accustomed to manipulating readers’ emotions, and will understand your own emotions on a deeper level.

So you could say that writing fiction is therapeutic, and good for you. Remember to have fun with it. 🙂

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

Step By Step To Fiction Which Sells: Plotting And Scene Magic

eBook: $5.99

Your readers want to enter your novel's world. They want to experience your book -- they want to live your book with your main characters.

More info →
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Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

Master Fiction Writing: Craft A Novel in 31 Days

$4.99
Author:
Series: Selling Writer Strategies, Book 4
Genre: Writing
Tag: writing fiction

You want to write a novel. Perhaps you can't get started. Or maybe you got started, and then you stopped.You need a plan, broken down into easy steps. This program began as a 30-day challenge which I organized for readers in 2010. Hundreds of writers joined the challenge and completed it. They wrote novels.

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